Saturday, June 30, 2018

Heat Warning extended To Monday, daytime highs are forecast to reach the mid thirties with humidex values into the mid forties.




[ms_custom_box backgroundimage="http://junctioneer.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/4CA43D49-EC9E-41FF-88FE-C90E2BD2C909-300x54.jpeg" fixed_background="yes" background_position="top left" padding="7" class="" id=""]Overnight Sunday - Monday low temperatures are expected to be in the low to mid twenties, providing little or no relief from the heat. On Monday, daytime highs are forecast to reach the mid thirties with humidex values into the mid forties. Daytime highs in the low thirties are expected to persist through most of next week.[/ms_custom_box]

 


[ms_alert icon="" background_color="#e25914" text_color="#ffffff" border_width="0" border_radius="0" box_shadow="no" dismissable="no" class="" id=""]Heat Warning into its 3rd day[/ms_alert][ms_alert icon="" background_color="#e25914" text_color="#ffffff" border_width="0" border_radius="0" box_shadow="no" dismissable="Yes” class="" id=""]This will be the most significant heat event in the past few years.[/ms_alert]





Extreme heat event for the Canada Day long weekend.








Continuing through the Canada Day long weekend, daytime highs are forecast to reach the low to mid thirties with humidex values into the mid forties. Overnight low temperatures are expected to be in the low to mid twenties, except high teens in some rural areas, providing little or no relief from the heat.

Current indications suggest hot temperatures could persist through next week. This will be the most significant heat event in the past few years.





Friday, June 29, 2018

2639 Dundas Street West city council item July 4th

This application proposes an 8-storey (27.5 metre, including mechanical penthouse) residential building at 2639 Dundas Street West. The proposed development includes 107 units. Forty seven vehicle parking spaces and 192 bicycle parking spaces will be provided within a two-level underground parking garage accessed from Dundas Street West.


This report reviews and recommends approval of the application to amend the Zoning By-law.

The City Planning Division recommends that:


 

1. City Council amend Zoning By-law 438-86 for the lands at 2639 Dundas Street West substantially in accordance with the draft Zoning By-law Amendment attached as Attachment No. 11 to the report (June 18, 2018) from the Acting Director, Community Planning, Toronto and East York District.

2. City Council amend City of Toronto Zoning By-law 569-2013 for the lands at 2639 Dundas Street West substantially in accordance with the draft Zoning By-law Amendment attached as Attachment No. 12 to the report (June 18, 2018) from the Acting Director, Community Planning, Toronto and East York District.

3. City Council authorizes the City Solicitor to make such stylistic and technical changes to the draft Zoning By-law Amendment as may be required.

4. Before introducing the necessary Bills to City Council for enactment, the owner shall be required to:

a. submit a revised Functional Servicing Report and Stormwater Management Report to the satisfaction of the Chief Engineer and Executive Director, Engineering and Construction Services; and,

b. enter into a financially secured agreement for the construction of any improvements to the municipal infrastructure, should it be determined that upgrades and road improvements are required to support the development, according to the functional servicing report accepted by the Chief Engineer and Executive Director of Engineering and Construction Services.

2706-2730 Dundas Street West, development

Summary

On August 2, 2017 an application was submitted for a 12-storey (45.03 metres including a 5-metre mechanical penthouse) mixed-use building containing 173 residential units, at 2706-2730 Dundas Street West. 


 

On December 18, 2017, on the earliest possible appeal date, the applicant appealed the Zoning By-law Amendment application without any revisions to the proposal to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal (the LPAT) citing Council's failure to make a decision on the application within the timeframe prescribed by the Planning Act.


 

Following the appeal, the applicant on April 10, 2018 submitted a revised application for a 9-storey (37 metres including 5-metre mechanical penthouse) mixed-use building containing 151 residential units. 


 

This report recommends that the City Solicitor together with the City Planning staff and other appropriate staff be directed to oppose the application in its current form at the LPAT.


 

The proposed building height is too tall and does not fit within the existing and planned context  and does not comply with the Provincial Policy Statement (2014), does not conform to the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe (2017) and does not comply with the Official Plan or Mid-rise Guidelines.   

Proposal The Zoning By-law Amendment application proposes a 9-storey (37-metre, including a mechanical penthouse), mixed-use building with 151 units and a total gross floor area of 13,871 square metres.

The site abuts a 3.66 metre wide public lane. The application proposes to provide a 1.17 metre conveyance to widen the public lane.

The building footprint covers most of the site with an overall density of 6.8 times the area of the lot (See Attachment 10: Application Data Sheet).

There is a 5-storey streetwall with no setback from the Dundas Street West property line with the exception of the ground floor which is setback 1.19 metres. There is a stepback of 3.0 metres at the top of the 5th floor and another 1.5 metre stepback at the 7th floor. The 8th

floor projects out 1.5 metres. The 9th floor then steps back 6.0 metres. The mechanical penthouse has a stepback of 4.6 metres from the front edge of the 9th floor.

The ground floor at the back of the building is set back between 2.67 and 4.26 metres from the widened public lane to accommodate a rear pedestrian walkway and landscaped yards for 7-townhouse units fronting onto the public lane. The rear of the building is set back 2.9 metres from the proposed widened laneway with projecting balconies. The 7th floor is recessed an additional 0.6 metres.

The proposed building consists of 13,377 square metres of residential gross floor area. A total of 151 residential units are proposed which include 4 studio units (3%), 83 one-bedroom units (55%), 48 two-bedroom units (32%), 16 three-bedroom/townhouse units (10%). There is 522 sq. metres of retail ground floor space.

A total of 538 square metres of residential amenity space is proposed including 238 square metres of indoor and 300 square metres of outdoor space. The indoor amenity space will be provided on the main and second floors and the outdoor amenity space is split between the second floor and the roof level.

A total of 90 parking spaces (87 residential and 3 retail) is proposed in a three level underground parking garage. Entry to the underground garage is provided through a public lane at the north end of the property from Watkinson Avenue. The proposal includes 181 bicycle parking spaces (163 resident and 18 visitors), and one Type G loading space.

Junction east of Keele Street gets Heritage Conservation District, while west of Keele St, a far bigger area gets no protection.

The Junction Heritage Conservation District (HCD) Study At its meeting on May 13, 2014, Toronto and East York Community Council nominated the Junction (east of Keele Street) for consideration as a Heritage Conservation District (HCD). The Junction Heritage Conservation District study area consists of both sides of Dundas Street West between Gilmour Avenue and Humberside Avenue. The subject site is located within the boundary for the proposed Junction HCD.

On January 31, 2018, City Council directed City Planning staff to initiate Phase 1 of the Heritage Conservation District study for the Junction. HCD studies consist of a two part process, and involve a combination of research, field review and analysis, including extensive and meaningful consultation with the community prior to Council considering the designation. At the conclusion of Phase 1, a recommendation is made by staff to the Toronto Preservation Board for the creation of an HCD Plan including a proposed boundary, and/or may recommend other planning tools. This may include the designation of individual properties, creation of urban design guidelines, secondary plans or zoning by-law amendments.

Heritage Preservation Services was circulated on this application. As the study of the proposed Junction Heritage Conservation District has not commenced, staff did not have any comments on the proposed developme

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Extreme heat event for the Canada Day long weekend. This is the most significant heat event in the past few years.


[bmtextbox type="warning" title="This is the most significant heat event in the past few years." image="0"]Beginning Friday and continuing through the Canada Day long weekend, daytime highs are forecast to reach the low to mid thirties with humidex values into the mid forties. Overnight low temperatures are expected to be in the low to mid twenties, except high teens in some rural areas, providing little or no relief from the heat.Current indications suggest hot temperatures could persist through next week. This will be the most significant heat event in the past few years.###Extreme heat affects everyone.The risks are greater for young children, pregnant women, older adults, people with chronic illnesses and people working or exercising outdoors.Watch for the effects of heat illness: swelling, rash, cramps, fainting, heat exhaustion, heat stroke and the worsening of some health conditions.[/bmtextbox]

City residential construction dust mitigation report out.

residential construction dust mitigation report highlights.

Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards recommends that:

New By-law

1.  [su_highlight background="#DDFF99" color="#000000"]Council establish a Toronto Municipal Code Chapter for dust that is applicable to residential construction.

2.  City Council direct that every person engaging in, permitting, or directing construction activities on residential properties shall comply with the provisions of the Chapter, as set out in the recommendations of this report.

3.  [su_highlight background="#DDFF99" color="#000000"]Council mandate that the Dust By-law does not apply to necessary municipal work City, work occurring on commercial and industrial properties, and construction of a multi-residential building, subdivision, or mixed-use development.

4.  City Council mandate that the Dust By-law does not apply to residential demolition projects that have approved demolition permits.

Preventative Measures

5.  City Council direct that the Toronto Municipal Code Chapter for dust include the following:

a.  [su_highlight background="#DDFF99" color="#000000"]no person shall cause or permit dust[/su_highlight], or direct or cause a person to make dust, occurring [su_highlight background="#DDFF99" color="#000000"] as a result of residential construction activities [/su_highlight]that escapes from a residential property where the construction activity occurs and enters another premises;

b.  it is an offence for any person to take any action or fail to take any action that would result in dust under 5a; and

c.  the above does not apply where reasonable preventative measures were taken to prevent dust from escaping a residential property including one, or a combination of, the following dust control measures to the satisfaction of the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards:

i.  wetting the construction material;

ii.  using a wet saw;

iii.  using dustless saw technology;

iv.  tarping or otherwise containing the source of dust;

v.  installing wind fencing or a fence filter;

vi.  using a vacuum attachment when cutting; or

vii.  any other preventative measure deemed by the Executive Director, Municipal Licensing and Standards, to be adequate in the mitigation of dust escaping a residential property based on the nature of the activity.

[bmtextbox]As directed by City Council in PG10.1: Strategy for Minimizing the Negative Impacts of Residential Infill Construction Activity, this report recommends the creation of a bylaw to aid in the mitigation of dust created by residential construction activities.
The proposed bylaw would make it mandatory for every person engaging, directing, or permitting residential construction activities to take reasonable measures to mitigate the creation of dust and its impact on neighbouring properties. The bylaw would require that specific actions be taken in order to minimize the generation and distribution of dust. These measures may include using a wet saw, dustless saw technology, a vacuum attachment when cutting, and/or tarping to contain dust. Other measures include wetting construction material and installing wind fencing.
The proposed bylaw would apply to residential properties only. It would not apply to necessary municipal work, large-scale construction projects such as the construction of multi-residential buildings, subdivisions, or mixed use developments, and commercial and industrial properties. It would also exclude residential demolition projects that have an approved demolition permit.
The construction industry plays a key role in the maintenance and revitalization of residential neighbourhoods. However, residential construction has the potential to generate frequent and high levels of dust. The aim of the proposed bylaw is to aid in the mitigation of dust from construction on residential properties. Dust that may have a health or environmental impact will not be regulated by the proposed bylaw, as this type of dust is already regulated by the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change and the Ministry of Labour. Toronto Public Health also responds to complaints about dust, if there are health concerns[/bmtextbox]


[bmtextbox type="bm" title="residential construction dust mitigation links" image="0" textcolor="#000000"]

You can share your views on the report with the Committee on July 6th, either in-person or through a written deposition. To provide input at Licensing and Standards Committee, please email lsc@toronto.ca or call 416.397.4592. You can find more information about how to provide feedback by following this link

Licensing and Standards Committee

July 6th, 2018, Committee Room 1, City Hall

Meeting starts at 9:30am
[/bmtextbox]

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

In the Organic Garage July 7th 2018, Sustainable Block Party + Pop-Up Market


 

Vegan Social Events Presents: The Sustainable Block Party + Pop-Up Market, Saturday, July 7th, 2018

TORONTO, June 19, 2018 - Vegan Social Events is back this summer with The Sustainable Block Party + Pop-Up Market, in support of Tree Canada. This exciting event will bring together influencers, media makers, the community and local companies for delicious vegan food, drinks, eco-friendly shopping and more. This event will be held at Organic Garage in the Junction and is open to the public and free to attend from 11 am - 5 pm. Guest speakers including: James Aspey, an Australian Animal Rights Activist who is known for taking a 1-year vow of silence to raise awareness about animal cruelty, and cookbook author Sam Turnbull of It Doesn't Taste Like Chicken.

What: The Sustainable Block Party + Pop-Up Market When: Saturday, July 7, 2018 Where: Organic Garage, 43 Junction Road, Toronto Time: 11:00AM - 5:00PM

Vegan Social Events is proud to partner with Organic Garage, a Canadian grocery store that is dedicated to providing high quality organic products at everyday affordable prices. This event will be held outside their Junction location, overlooking the downtown Toronto skyline, with a view of the CN Tower.

More than 50 vendors will be joining the event to showcase sustainable, environmentally friendly products, including many locally-made items. There will be no shortage of delicious vegan food and drinks. Treat your taste buds to guilt-free eats and treats that will satisfy any craving, while enjoying eco-friendly shopping for cruelty-free and sustainable products. There will also be a raffle in support of Tree Canada, featuring over $1,000 worth of prizes to be won.

 


 

This event is proud to feature special guest speaking engagements and panel discussions, including keynote speaker James Aspey, an Australian Animal Rights Activist. James has overcome a battle with leukaemia, an eating disorder, and drug abuse, to become one of the most well-known animal rights activists in the current movement. He is best known for taking a 1-year vow of silence to raise awareness about animal cruelty, in addition to cycling 5,000 km across Australia and being tattooed for 25 hours straight for charity. James will have his sustainably made activism t-shirts available for sale at the event.

This event will also feature special guest Sam Turnbull, a local-Toronto cookbook author and creator of the popular blog, It Doesn't Taste Like Chicken and YouTube Channel. Sam will be hosting a talk on how she went vegan coming from a family of chefs, butchers, and hunters. Her talk will be followed by a book signing of her debut cookbook Fuss-Free Vegan: 101 Everyday Comfort Food Favorites, Veganized.

In an effort to make this Toronto's most sustainable event yet, the event organizers are working with the vendors to make this a minimal waste event. Vendors will be considering the environment by limiting the number of boxes, plastic, and other waste that may be produced from their booths. Guests are encouraged to bring their own reusable containers, cutlery, metal/ glass straws, reusable bottles and bags. Every little bit counts!

 

"We are looking forward to showing Torontonians how easy it is to live a more sustainable life," says Avra Epstein, Creator of Vegan Social Events. "This event will exemplify the ways in which we can vote with our dollar through our consumer choices, including the food we eat, the clothes we buy, and the lifestyle products that we use, all while supporting local business owners and a worthy charitable cause."

A portion of the proceeds from this event and all funds raised by the raffle will go to support Tree Canada, a registered charity proudly dedicated to planting and nurturing trees. For 25 years Tree Canada has engaged with communities, governments, corporations, and individuals in the pursuit of a greener and healthier living environment for Canadians. They have proudly planted more than 80 million trees since 1992.

Vegan Social Events is a special events platform created by Avra Epstein, founder of the popular blog Love Wild Live Free. Avra has gained a dedicated following and is passionate about inspiring others to live a sustainable vegan lifestyle. In September 2016, Vegan Social Events hosted the first ever Toronto Vegan Social Event. This event brought together influencers, media makers, and local vendors in celebration and support of the thriving Toronto vegan scene. This event was unique to the vegan community and well received by all who were involved. Since then, Vegan Social Events have completely sold out with line-ups out the door.

SOURCE Vegan Social Events

The Hole in the Wall one of the best bars in Toronto

Scarlett Road Bridge reconstruction Part 1.


Just the basics as published by the city for this important and historic reno.


2008, the City completed a study to address the safety and traffic operations in the area around the Scarlett Road Bridge. The study recommended making changes to the bridge and surroundings roads in order to improve the road capacity and reduce congestion.

Bridge and Road Improvements

Replacement of the railway bridge above Scarlett Rd and the addition of one northbound lane and one southbound lane under the bridge for a total of two lanes in each direction.

  • Lowering of Scarlett Road to allow large vehicles and trucks to pass underneath the bridge.
  • Improved sidewalks under the bridge and at the intersections at Scarlett Road and Dundas Street West and Scarlett Road and St. Clair Avenue West.
  • Addition of second northbound left turn lane on Dundas Street West and future bike lanes added on both sides of Dundas Street West.
  • New southbound left-turn lane from Scarlett Road to Dundas Street West.
  • New traffic control signal at Gooch Avenue and Dundas Street West and new left-turn lane from Dundas Street West to Gooch Avenue.
  • Road widening for future dedicated bike lanes on Dundas Street West and Scarlett Road.
  • New landscaping and public art.
  • The City is now moving forward with approved plans to reconstruct the bridge and reconfigure the intersection. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2018 and is expected to last approximately three years.

 

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Dressmakers operating in Toronto 1888-9.

Alexander Miss f Andrews Miss I Baker Mrs __ Ball Mrs M Banfield Mrs '- Barber Mrs A M Barker laIrs M Barnett Mrs l Barrett Mrs ] Barton Miss J Bell Mrs S M Belmore Miss Q Bennett Miss Beston Mrs Blair Miss u Boddy Mrs Bolan Mrs f Bond Mrs Bondidier Miss M Bourne Miss Bowker Mrs M Brander Miss l Breen Mrs Brown Mrs L Brownridge Mrs Buifey Mrs Burgoine Miss M Burnett Miss J Burrill Mrs Burton l\Iiss Campbell Miss A M Carpenter Miss : Carrick Miss L Carruthers Mrs Carter J 86 A Case Mrs M Cattle Miss _ Chambers Miss .- Chester Mrs A L Clay Mrs M Climie laIrs L. Collinet Mrs A. Connolly Mrs l Cook Mrs E Cook Miss S F Copeland Miss R Corner Mrs S R_ Craig Mrs M Crow Mrs E P Cruttendeu Miss E Curnber Miss E Cunnington Miss C Dewar Mrs E Dobbie Miss E Dockery Miss L Doudiet Mrs I Doyle Miss E Doyle Miss M Doyle Miss N Duffield Mrs C Dugery Miss M Elev Mrs S Ellard Miss J Evans Miss M Fair Mrs R Fee Mrs R Ferguson Mrs 81 Fieldhouse Miss G Fieroe Mrs C S Finnigan :Mrs M E Flowers Mrs J Foster Misses Franks Miss J Fraser Miss .7 Fraser Mrs M Fryer Mrs S Garland Mrs J R Gladish K & A Glassey Mrs L Godfrey Mrs E Gurnett illiss H A Hackett Misses Hackett Mrs E Haggart Mrs D Haines Mrs L Hammond Mrs F P Hampton Mrs G Harris Mrs A \V Hart Miss E' Haslett la[iss M Henning Miss J Hickman Mrs E Hider Mrs H E Hillman Miss E Hilts Miss M Hodgson laIrs L Holland Miss E (So adv p 1033) Howell Mrs J M Howells Miss A Hudgin lrs L Hughes la[iss M Jac son Mrs J Jordan Mrs \V Keffer Miss M Kelly Miss L C Kerr Miss A Kilburn Miss P Kin rear Miss M Kirkpatrick Miss S Knot Mrs S A Kyle Miss M Lake Mrs A Cook Mrs E Cook Miss S F Copeland Miss R Corner Mrs S R_ Craig Mrs M Crow Mrs E P Cruttendeu Miss E Curnber Miss E Cunnington Miss C Dewar Mrs E Dobbie Miss E Dockery Miss L Doudiet Mrs I Doyle Miss E Doyle Miss M Doyle Miss N Duffield Mrs C Dugery Miss M Elev Mrs S Ellard Miss J Evans Miss M Fair Mrs R Fee Mrs R Ferguson Mrs 81 Fieldhouse Miss G Fieroe Mrs C S Finnigan :Mrs M E Flowers Mrs J Foster Misses Franks Miss J Fraser Miss .7 Fraser Mrs M Fryer Mrs S Garland Mrs J R Gladish K & A Glassey Mrs L Godfrey Mrs E Gurnett illiss H A Hackett Misses Hackett Mrs E Haggart Mrs D Haines Mrs L Hammond Mrs F P Hampton Mrs G Harris Mrs A \V Hart Miss E' Haslett la[iss M Henning Miss J Hickman Mrs E Hider Mrs H E Hillman Miss E Hilts Miss M Hodgson laIrs L Holland Miss E (So adv p 1033) Howell Mrs J M Howells Miss A Hudgin lrs L Hughes la[iss M Jac son Mrs J Jordan Mrs \V Keffer Miss M Kelly Miss L C Kerr Miss A Kilburn Miss P Kin rear Miss M Kirkpatrick Miss S Knot Mrs S A Kyle Miss M Lake Mrs A Pollard Miss M 'J Pollard Mrs M A Popert Mrs L Ratcliffe Miss Rawson Miss H M Reader Mrs L Reid lVIiss M Robinson Miss L Robinson Misses Roche Miss L Robinson Miss -. Seaton Mrs F J Short Mrs M Q Simpson Miss E C Simpson Miss 1, Sinclair Mrs M Skaith Miss M Sleemin2' laIrs South 1V___- .- Smith Miss Smith Miss 1 Smith Mrs l Smith Miss . Smith Wm Snowdon Miss Q Stevens Mrs l Stewart Mrs Stewart Mrs Stokes Miss Q.- Storay Mrs M . Storr Misses Strong' Mrs L Stuart 82; Riddell Sullivan Miss L. u Sutherland Mrs Wm Switzer Mrs -_ Tannenbaum Abraham Thompson Miss ] Thompson Miss . Thorbeck Mrs 1 Thornton Mrs _ Toms Mrs A J Towers Mrs Tucker Mrs C A Tullv Mrs M Upthegrove Mrs Walker Mrs l. v. Wallace Mrs J Whistle Mrs l.. \Vhitton Mrs Q, Wicks Mrs M Wilks Mrs . Willett Mrs L Williamson Mrs 1 Willis Bllisses Wilson Miss -_ Winfield Miss ... Wingle Miss M Woodhall Miss II/I Woods Mrs l. Wright laIrs 1. Weigley Mrs v Young Miss I source: ONTARIO GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 1888-9. PUBLISHED BIENNIALLY BY R. L. POLK & CO. R. L. POLK, J. W. WEEKS, A. DUEEILL, PUBLISHERS OP CITY, PROVINCIAL AND STATE DIRECTORIES AND GAZETTEERS FOR CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES.

Chair images from Tonder, correction notes are in the PDF

 

Arts impresario David Mirvish jumps into fintech with investment in small-business lender FundThrough

Arts impresario David Mirvish jumps into fintech with investment in small-business lender FundThrough

link to article


Arts impresario David Mirvish is making a significant investment in financial technology firm FundThrough, the modern-day equivalent of the small-business lenders that helped him and his entrepreneur father start their own successful companies years ago.

With a $3.2-million investment, Mr. Mirvish is the largest equity investor in the $34-million Series A financing, which includes $9-million in equity and a $25-million credit facility. The move is Mr. Mirvish’s first direct investment in a fintech company and a departure from his regular investments in theatre, art and real estate.

 

 

Monday, June 25, 2018

High Park at Night: Urban Bat Walk, Wednesday, July 4th & 11th 8:30 pm to 10 pm


[bmtextbox type="alert" title="High Park at Night: Urban Bat Walk" image="0” textcolor="#F88017"]Wednesday, July 4th & 11th 8:30 pm to 10 pm High Park Forest School Join High Park Nature Centre in exploring High Park’s amazing and mysterious bat populations! Using hand-held bat detectors, you will listen for bats’ ultrasonic calls in High Park, explore their habitat, behaviour, and favourite foods as they swoop and loop during their evening, mid-air forage. This is a free event! Suggested donation of $2-$5/ person. Supported by Kiwanis Club of Toronto.[/bmtextbox]


[bmtextbox type="alert" title="Map link Google" image="0"]High Park Forest School click 🔜 (375 Colborne Lodge Dr)[/bmtextbox]



Canada Day Picnic 12 to 2 p.m. at High Park

 

 

[bmtextbox type="alert" title="Arif Virani MP for Parkdale-High Park" image="0"]Sunday, July 1, from 12 to 2 p.m. at High Park (Bloor Street Entrance), for my annual Canada Day picnic![/bmtextbox]

 

 

Company types in the junction 1960

[bmtextbox]Firms in the Junction, 1960[/bmtextbox]

[bmtextbox type="bm" title="Type of Firm" image="0" textcolor="#000000"]

Food  9

Textiles  5

Paints, rubber, chemicals 9

Metal-using 19

Other 14

Auto body and auto  repair 16

Wholesalers and warehouses 56

Trucking Companies 12

Transport  7

station Scrap Dealers 7

Construction 3

Laundry 7

Bakery, Dairy 5

[/bmtextbox]

 

 

 

High Park Community Alliance draft review request.

Thank you for your interest in the City of Toronto's High Park Apartment Neighbourhood Area Character Study.
 
As part of the ongoing community consultation for this study, we invite you to visit the City's webpage to review the Draft Urban Design Guidelines for the area.
 
Please submit your comments on these Draft Guidelines to the City staff team by or before Tuesday, June 26, 2018.

A final version of the Guidelines will be published and presented to Etobicoke York Community Council for consideration at the July 4, 2018 meeting.

Allison Reid, M.Pl., MCIP RPP
Senior Urban Designer
416-392-1295 | Allison.Reid@toronto.ca
 
Elisabeth Silva Stewart, MCIP RPP
Community Planner
416-394-6006 | Elisabeth.SilvaStewart@toronto.ca

Etobicoke York District
City Planning Division, City of Toronto

Sunday, June 24, 2018

Canada has three companies in the Global 100 companies, unfortunately they are all banks.

[su_box title="Canada’s three top global companies" style="default" box_color="#F73F43" title_color="#FFFFFF" radius="0"]Number 54 TD BANK GROUP CA Number 42 S ROYAL BANK OF CANADA CA Number 88 BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA CA in top 100 [/su_box]

As opposed to manufactures and research companies


Number 54 TD BANK GROUP CA

Number 42 S ROYAL BANK OF CANADA CA

Number 88 BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA CA

in top 100

METHODOLOGY

THE FORBES GLOBAL 2000 IS A LIST OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST PUBLIC COMPANIES AS MEASURED BY REVENUES, PROFITS, ASSETS AND MARKET VALUE AS OF MAY 11, USING DATA FROM FACTSET RESEARCH SYSTEMS. WE WEIGHT THE FOUR METRICS EQUALLY TO COME UP WITH A COMPOSITE SCORE. NOT INCLUDED ARE EMPLOYEE- OR COOPERATIVE-OWNED ENTITIES SUCH AS HUAWEI OF CHINA AND FONTERRA OF NEW ZEALAND. COMPANIES STRUCTURED AS LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS, SUCH AS SOME LARGE PRIVATE EQUITY FIRMS, ARE EXCLUDED FOR ACCOUNTING INCONSISTENCIES. LATER ACTIVITY NOT REFLECTED.


 

Source: Forbes_Asia_-_06_2018.pdf

Saturday, June 23, 2018

Greenest Neigbourhoods, Volunteer Training and Information Session this Monday the 25.

Toronto's Greenest Neigbourhoods (TGN)


Volunteer Training and Information Session


Monday, June 25, 6-8 PM
Jane / Dundas Library, 620 Jane Street
RSVP: 
https://tgn-volunteer-training.eventbrite.ca

Would you like to learn how to help your community become the greenest one in Toronto?

  • Do you know why now is the best time for home upgrades that can make a home more energy efficient and comfortable?

  • Are you, and your neighbours, aware that there are thousands of dollars available in rebates for replacing windows, doors, furnace, air conditioner, or ading insulation?

  • Did you know there are free programs for seniors and families with limited incomes?

  • Did you know the City has a program to HELP fund these upgrades?


To find answers to all these questons, join Green 13, Project Neutral, Enviromentum and the City of Toronto staff for this training and information session. Learn from those who are most passionate and most in the know about these issues.

You don’t need to be an expert to help people use energy efficiency programs. 

Green 13’s partner Enviromentum will be conducting an experiential training to help you build your confidence in assisting your neighbours green their homes. This training will include:

  • Explanation and practice experiences for a 3-step pathway to engage your neighbours in home energy efficiency

  • Demonstration and practice of the pre-made tools, that help you lead your neighbours to answer the question “What is the best program for me”

  • Practice on how to close out the conversation and lead to the most positive outcome of your volunteer time - your neighbour choosing to weatherize based on their own reasons!

Dundas St W and Pacific Ave to have some affordable rents and mid price apartments

[su_box title="Apartment details affordable rents and mid price" style="default" box_color="#F9B7FF" title_color="#F52887" radius="0"]owner shall provide at least 1 bachelor, 2 one-bedroom, and 1 two-bedroom replacement rental dwelling units at affordable rents, at least 2 two-bedroom and 1 three-bedroom replacement rental dwelling units at mid-range rents for a period of at least 10 years, beginning from the date of first occupancy.[/su_box]

Friday, June 22, 2018

Dundas St W and Pacific Ave to have apartments for 20 years as part of condo planning permission.

[su_box title="Apartment details" style="default" box_color="#FF8040" title_color="#F52887" radius="0"]owner shall provide and maintain not less than 7 replacement rental dwelling units, comprised of 1 bachelor unit, 2 one-bedroom units, 3 two-bedroom units and 1 three-bedroom unit, at 2978-2988 Dundas Street West and 406-408 Pacific Avenue for a period of at least 20 years .[/su_box]

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Junction Summer Solstice Festival Map



 

[caption id="attachment_285" align="aligncenter" width="680"] Click for full size[/caption]

Fire clock tower on Yonge St. Windows and complete tower visable after decades



Above round windows hidden for decades visible.



 

Above full tower, building will be renewed, present on Yonge St. After condo finished.

 

 



Above site photo, facing west.
 

 

 

 

This photo shows a sidewalk being used as space to make a concrete form (left) and a dummy form right to support the left form which was made correct foundation problems in basement foundation. This work will see really the only street positioned historic elements in all the many condos fronting on Yonge St.

 

 

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Music on The Junction Solstice Stage, June 23

You are hearing it here first! The Solstice Stage line-up went live on our websitethis morning. Our public press release detailing the performers goes out to the media tomorrow. As a Junction Insider, here is your exclusive peek at this year's performers:Music on The Solstice Stage

Noon - Greilsammer

 2:00 - Too Young To Go Steady

 4:00 - Long Branch

 9:00 - In Drift

10:00 - JACELYN Entertainment on The Solstice Stage

3:00 - Community Hour
Local dancers + Student performers

5:00 - Trivia in The Junction
Two challenging Rounds

7:00 - Comedy in The Junction
Four hilarious comedians
Hosted by Jordan Foiey
Junction Insider Tip: COME EARLY! 

Exciting Israeli band opens festival.

Our first performer, starting at NOON, is internationally renowned Greilsammer. Arriving from Jerusalem, and on their way to The Ottawa Jazz Festival, Greilsammer’s music creates unique fusions: Reggae with Irish violin, Folk with Rock, and Classical with World music. Singing in Hebrew, French + English, their highly energetic performance will ke

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Parkdale, 1st Zero Waste Community Action Planning

The 1st Zero Waste Community Action Planning session will help build a shared vision of zero waste for Parkdale.


Here are some of the topics:

  • Community Sharing & Creative Reuse

  • e-Waste, Repair & Cycling

  • Ecoparents

  • Ecofashion & Household Goods

  • Community Cleanups

  • Communications: Outreach, Education & Advocacy

  • Food: gleaning, growing, planning, prep, compost & MORE!


Connect and get involved with neighbours and organizations in reducing waste in Parkdale. To register click HERE or call 647-438-0038 (Greenest City).



Date: Tuesday, June 19th, 2018

Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Place: 1303 Queen St. W., (Parkdale Library auditorium)

ARTiculations graduate art show

 

[su_highlight]June 13 - July 13[/su_highlight]

 

 

 

 

 

The Thesis Award Show is a collaboration between ARTiculations and Akin Collective in support of graduating post secondary students. A call was sent out across the Province for applications in search of students demonstrating a coherent body of work unique in both concept and execution. Overwhelmed by the response, we extend a huge thank you to all of the applicants and congratulate this year's winner, Michelle Peraza. In addition to a solo exhibition, Michelle will receive studio credit with Akin Collective as part of the award.

MICHELLE PERAZA 

Patria Potestas 
June 13 - July 13
Reception: Thursday, June 14th, 7-9pm

(image hosted at source, original publisher)

In Peraza's highly detailed, thoughtful portraits there are mirrors to be found in the pensive faces of the artist's friends and family. How do we, too, trace the lines in our own faces, the paths of our own familial history? These meticulously made paintings hint at the architecture of others while leaving room for us to not only relate, but to imagine narratives also. What tales do these faces tell? What chapters are next? Each wrinkle feels familiar yet strange, each gaze friendly yet focused. Michelle is a graduate of the Ontario College of Art and Design University.

Text by Michael Vickers

Exhibitions held at ARTiculations | Earl Selkirk Gallery  
2928 Dundas St West
Toronto, ON
M6P 1Y8
Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | articulations.ca

Gallery Hours

Mon-Fri: 11-6
Saturday: 11-5
Sunday: 12-5

Contact Information

Heather Phillips
416.901.7464
heather@articulations.ca

ARTiculations
Located in The Junction, ARTiculations is an independently owned and operated Art Supply Store, Art Gallery and Studio offering quality art supplies and services to artists and creative explorers of all ages. We are passionate about the power of creativity and its potential for personal transformation.
heather@articulations.ca
(416) 901-7464
Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

Akin Collective
Akin is a Toronto-based arts organization that provides affordable studio space to nearly 300 artists across its 8 locations. In addition, Akin programs roughly 60 arts-based events per year across the city. Akin’s studios provide a working environment that maintains a friendly and inspiring atmosphere where people can work on creative endeavours and entrepreneurial undertakings of all kinds. Akin builds community through monthly art critiques, workshops, open studio events, gallery tours, exhibitions, as well as various other art projects.
Twitter Facebook | Instagram
info@akincollective.com
(416) 826-2053

Feed It Forward, probably the best food source to open in the Junction for decades

 

[su_box title="Feed it Forward" style="glass" box_color="#bff0c4"] Pay What You Can Grocery Store, Bakery and Coffee Shop launches June 16 at 3324 Dundas West in the Junction. The store is open from 12 to 7 pm.[/su_box]

 

The grocery store is one of Feed It Forward’s many initiatives to combat food insecurity and waste as well as to provide subsidized food to Toronto households in need.

“We rescue daily 1,000 pounds of produce. We make nutritiously balanced meals, put them in biodegradable containers and feed as many people possibly for free,”

 

 

Produce comes from Greenwood Farms, an organic farm.

The grocery store will not only sell organic locally sourced produce, but also usual grocery store staples.

fresh baked goods, bread, pastries, fresh brewed coffee or coffee beans, and their daily provisions of rice, beans, sugar, flour.

 

 

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

3 exciting new posts today BEER, Traffic Lights, and new traffic corridor in the Junction

scroll down, they are below

Traffic Study - Keele, Dundas West, Pacific, and Vine Corridor

[ms_icon icon="fa-car" size="43" color="#e0003b" icon_box="no" class="" id=""]

 

[ms_icon icon="fa-truck" size="48" color="#fdd200" icon_box="no" class="" id=""]

Community Council Decision in Favor

Etobicoke York Community Council:

1 - Motion to Adopt Item as Amended moved by Councillor Sarah Doucette (Carried)

1. Requested the Director, Transportation Services, Etobicoke York District to review the existing traffic studies completed by the City and submitted through local development applications within the Keele Street, Dundas Street West, Pacific Avenue, and Vine Street corridor, and report to the local Councillor, on what changes can be made within the corridor, and to the Keele Street and Dundas Street West.

[ms_alert icon="fa-rocket" background_color="#FCDFFF" text_color="#232323" border_width="2" border_radius="0" box_shadow="no" dismissable="no" class="" id=""]Origin. (June 6, 2018) Letter from Councillor Sarah Doucette, Ward 13, Parkdale-High Park [/ms_alert]

[su_box title="Corridor meaning linear agglomerations " style="default" box_color="#F73F43" title_color="#FFFFFF" radius="0"]. [su_highlight background="#DDFF99" color="#000000"]Traffic concerns have continued to grow in the Junction neighbourhood,[/su_highlight] with a recent studies showing a dramatic increase in the volume of traffic on local roads in the area. With [su_highlight background="#DDFF99" color="#000000"]six development applications in the Junction community,[/su_highlight] three of which are in the Keele Street, Dundas Street West, Pacific Avenue, and Vine Street corridor, this issue will continue to grow.[/su_box]

 

Background Information Image of Letter Link.
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2018/ey/bgrd/backgroundfile-116193.pdf)

MotionsMotion to Add New Business at Committee moved by Councillor Sarah Doucette (Carried)

 

That Etobicoke York Community Council amend the Recommendation contained in the letter (June 6, 2018) from Councillor Sarah Doucette, Ward 13, Parkdale-High Park, As in paragraph 1 above.

 

 

City supports High Park Brewery - 839 Runnymede Road Liquor Sales Licence.

High Park Brewery - 839 Runnymede Road (Ward 11)

[su_box title="High Park Brewery - 839 Runnymede Road " style="default" box_color="#7E3817" title_color="#FFFFFF" radius="0"]Etobicoke York Community Council votes OK on June 6, 2018EY31.20[/su_box]

City Council advise the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario of its support of the application from High Park Brewery, located at 839 Runnymede Road, for a Manufacturer's Limited Liquor Sales Licence.

Origin. (May 10, 2018) Letter from Councillor Frances Nunziata, Ward 11, York South-Weston

Summary

High Park Brewery has acquired space at 839 Runnymede Road to operate a brewery. As part of the operations at this new business, the owner intends on serving alcohol and for this reason, an application has been submitted to the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario (AGCO) for a Manufacturers Limited Liquor Sales Licence.


 

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As part of the application process for a Manufacturers Limited Liquor Sales Licence, the AGCO requires a resolution from Council in support of the issuance of this licence.

[su_divider top="no" text="Go to top" style="default" divider_color="#F73F43" link_color="#F87431" size="10” margin="16"]

High Park Brewery has acquired space at 839 Runnymede Road to operate a brewery. As part of the operations at this new business, the owner intends on serving alcohol and for this reason, an application has been submitted to the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario (AGCO) for a Manufacturers Limited Liquor Sales Licence.

Background Information(May 10, 2018) Letter from Councillor Frances Nunziata, Ward 11, York South-Weston regarding a Manufacturer's Limited Liquor Sales Licence Application - High Park Brewery, 839 Runnymede Road
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2018/ey/bgrd/backgroundfile-114971.pdf)

Annette Street and Quebec Avenue to get lights red yellow and green.


ACTION

Adopted

[su_box title="Annette Street and Quebec Avenue to get lights" style="default" box_color="#F87431" title_color="#FFFFFF" radius="0"]Etobicoke York Community Council votes OK on June 6, 2018EY31.20[/su_box]


 

Ward:13

Traffic Control Signals - Annette Street and Quebec Avenue

Monday, June 11, 2018

Curbs in the Junction are disappearing, making it easier for cars to run n up onto sidewalks

 


Ever notice that the curbs in the Junction are disappearing with the rising levels of road paving material and the build up every time they do remedial road surface work.

For a long time the city ripped up the old road surface and laid down new underlayment and asphalt.

Most Junction streets have not been resurfaced in this manner for over 2 decades, they have had the surface ground and overlaid with a thin liquid re-coating. This Slurry Seal it is a mixture of emulsion, aggregate, water and mineral filler applied to an asphalt surface, but now, in most cases this seal usefulness has been worn away.


 

[su_divider top="no" text="Go to top" style="default" divider_color="#F73F43" link_color="#F73F43" size="1" margin="16"]


 

Many curbs are in such low height streets that a car or truck can simply roll over the curb with little speed.

[su_divider top="no" text="Go to top" style="default" divider_color="#F73F43" link_color="#F73F43" size="1" margin="16"]


 

How curbs lead to greater safety.

While most curbs are psychological deterrent to drivers than a barrier to vehicles. Cars are only redirected at low speeds and shallow glancing angles.

It does make a difference in traffic speeds. A recent study found that streets with curbs and sidewalks have average speeds 7 mph less than similar roads without curbs or sidewalks. To put this into perspective, at 25 mph, a pedestrian has an 80% chance of surviving getting hit by a car. At 35 mph, it’s 50%. At 45 mph, the chances of living are only 20%. Slowing traffic down dramatically increases safety.

Source(s):

AASHTO Roadside Design Guide http://www.streetsblog.org/2009/12/02/ey…
http://www.ct.gov/dot/LIB/dot/documents/…

from wikipedia …

A curb (US English), or kerb (UK English), is the edge where a raised pavement/sidewalk/footpath, road median, or road shoulder meets an unraised streetor other roadway.

Function

Curbs may fulfill any or several of a number of functions. They separate the road from the roadside, discouraging drivers from parking or driving on sidewalks and lawns. They also provide structural support to the pavement edge. Curbs can be used to channel runoff waterfrom rain, or melted snow and ice into storm drains. There is also an aesthetic aspect, in that curbs look formal and “finished”.

Since curbs add to the cost of a road, they are generally limited to urban and suburban areas, and are rarely found in rural areas except where certain drainage conditions (such as mountains or culverts) make them necessary. Curbs are not universally used, however, even in urban settings (see living street).

best curb site anywhere on the internets

Junction Historical Society, looking for volunteers to help at Junction Summer Solstice.

Is still looking for volunteers to help at the WTJHS table at the Junction Summer Solstice Festival on Saturday, June 23rd.
[su_box title="When they need the help" style="default" box_color="#F73F43" title_color="#FFFFFF" radius="0"]Shifts are from 12 PM - 2:30 PM, 2:30 PM - 5 PM, and 5- 8 PM. Individuals who can help with set-up (11 AM- 12 PM) and tear down (@8 PM) are also required.[/su_box]


We appreciate all volunteers who can support the WTJHS!

Contact Hope Humphrey at hopewestend@gmail.com or junctionhistorical@gmail.com if you can join us.

The Stanley Cup travels around the world about 300 days each year.


 


“The Stanley Cup Presentation Cup.” Introduced in 1947, this is the one players parade around the ice today, travels around the world for about 300 days each year.

Other facts,

  • Lord Stanley of Preston, purchased the 7 1/ 2-inch-by-111/2-inch sterling silver bowl from a smith in Sheffield, England, for 10 guineas ($50 then, $1,200 today).
  • The Cup's lore is that the same trophy gets presented every year

Humber treatment plan, city request for repairs, needs to send water that id not fit to enter the lake into the lake.

[ms_promo_box style="boxed" border_color="#8fa587" border_width="1" border_position="left" background_color="#f5f5f5" button_color="" button_link="" button_icon="" button_text="" button_text_color="#ffffff" class="" id=""]The city is requesting proposals from firms, File: RFP 9119-17-7069 – To correct serious problems at the Humber treatment plan. The plant which for the past ten years has been under constant repair and upgrade stll needs to send water that id not fit to enter the lake into the lake.[/ms_promo_box]


[su_heading style="default" size="16" margin="0"]Waste water from your Junction home may be pushed into Lake Ontario only partly treated.[/su_heading]


 

Below the blog has sumeruzed the most importament points about the current plan, and discharge problems.

Humber Treatment Plant is one of four wastewater treatment facilities

Began operating in 1960 and has a rated capacity of 473,000 m3 per day.

Wastewater flows to the plant via a common sewer which combines the flow from the Queensway Sanitary Trunk Sewer and Humber Sanitary Trunk Sewer.

A portion of the Humber Treatment Plant sewer shed consists of combined sanitary and storm sewers, causing plant influent to be sensitive to wet weather events.

There is also an upstream combined sewer overflow (CSO) point at Berry Road which is set to protect the plant from flooding in extremely high flows. In the event the plant cannot receive, treat and dispense with the entire incoming flow to the plant, the sewer will back up and overflow a the Berry Road CSO. Generally, rain events of 10 mm or more in the sewer shed will result in a CSO, however that is not a set number.

The Humber Treatment Plant normally discharges effluent approximately 500 m out in Lake Ontario by gravity there is also a the Effluent Pumping Station (EPS) to push high flows out to Lake Ontario when the lake level was high.

The EPS has very limited use at this point and is also at the end of its useful life, it would need a major overhaul to become fully reliable
During extreme wet weather events, the plant experiences very rapid increases in flow, which typically last only a few hours. The peak flows during these events bypass the secondary treatment and only receive preliminary and primary treatment before being disinfected and discharged into Lake Ontario.

Saturday, June 9, 2018

Parkdale the place and people 1888

 


Parkdale the pls e and people 1888

All information from years 1888-9.

PARKDALE. An incorporated town on the GT and CPR ry and on the shore of Lake Ontario and immediately adjoining the western boundary of the city of Toronto, in York tp, York Co.

It was incorporated in 1885, and contains
5 churches and public and separate schools,
a mechanics' institute with a library of 1,300 volumes,
a town hall,
a fire hall with an efficient brigade
and two weekly newspapers, the News and the Times and West York Review. assessed valuation of real and personal property, §3,217,414 ;
bonded indebtedness, $183,209.

It is lighted with gas and has a good system of waterworks.

Population, 3,400.
Telegraph,

GNW and CPR. Telephone connection.

Express, Dominion, Vickers', American and Canadian.

Mail daily.

Note: Queen St in Parkdale had it’s own numbering system, unrelated to the current numbering system in place currently (2018)


[su_note note_color="#FFFF66" text_color="#333333"]Noteable People of the period.[/su_note]

  1. Wm T Gray, postmaster.
  2. Abercrombie James, planing mill, 12 Noble
  3. Armstrong John, carriagemakers, 6 Brockton Road.
  4. Austin John A, druggist, 74 Queen.
  5. Aylesworth Robert B, physcn, 230 Queen.
  6. Babe Thomas, general store, 106 Queen.
  7. Baker Henry T, furniture, 36 Queen.
  8. Barker Merritt, grocer, 110 Queen.
  9. Barnetson John C, waggonmaker, 8 Noble.
  10. Bernard John, grocer, 208 Sorauren ave.
  11. Birdsall Richard R, milk dir, 134 Macdonell ave.
  12. Bloomberg Mrs Rosanna, hotel, 1 Queen.
  13. Booth George S, grocer, 72 Queen.
  14. Boyd David, general store, 37 Queen.
  15. Brandon Thomas E, coal, 101 Queen.
  16. Brown & Burns, (Charles J Brown, John Burns jr,), hardware, 48 Queen.
  17. Burr Mrs Lizzie E, dressmkr, 52 West Lodge ave.
  18. Butler & Kelly,(John Butler,James Kelly), plumbers, 6 Queen.
  19. CampbellD & Co, (Donald Campbell), lumber, 13 Brockton rd.
  20. Canadian PacificRailway.
  21. Carey Robert, contractr, 42 Lansdowne ave.
  22. Clarke Edward S, grocer, 158 Queen.
  23. Clarke Robert, watchmaker, 64^ Queen.
  24. Clinkinbroomer Thomas, florist, 247 Roncesvalles ave.
  25. Cookey E & J, (Elizabeth and Jane), millinery, 52 Queen.
  26. Connolly John F, ticket agt, 18 Queen.
  27. Copeland Wm W, barber, 18 Queen.
  28. Cox Samuel, blacksmith, 35 Queen.
  29. Davies Cornelius, painter, 24 Gwynne ave.
  30. Dean Frederick H, grocer, 22 Queen.
  31. Dixon Wm J, harnessmaker, 112 Queen.
  32. Douglas John, barrister, 20^ Queen.
  33. Dunning A B, canner, 10 Abbs.
  34. Ecclestone& Spaulding, (Alfred Ecclestone, Wesley Spaulding), real estate, 188 Queen.
  35. Edwards Thomas, real estate, 97 Queen.
  36. Emeler John, liquors, 75 Queen.
  37. Ewing SV B, photographer, 2 Queen.
  38. Fitzgerald Thomas, plastr, 39 Sorauen ave.
  39. Fleming & Mitchell, coal, 109 Queen.
  40. Fortune Robert, carpenter, 10 O'Hara ave.
  41. Fox Ralph, florist, 29 Garden ave.
  42. Frampton Richard J, baker, 122 Queen.
  43. Franklin Miss M,music tchr, 26 Elm Grove.
  44. Freeman Alfred, locksmith, 240 Macdonell ave.
  45. French Bros, (Edward H, and Frederick), butchers, 324 Queen.
  46. French Edward, grocer, 185 Sorauren ave.
  47. Gailer Charles, butcher, 210 Queen.
  48. Gall Thomas, coal, 46 Duncan.
  49. Gander Thomas, plasterer.
  50. Garbutt Arthur G, blksmth, 5 Brock
  51. Giles Orlando, confy, 127 Close ave.
  52. Goodman Benjamin, baker, 46 O'Hara ave.
  53. Gordon C M, estate agent, 120 Queen.
  54. Gowaiilock Andrew G, propr The Times 24 Queen
  55. Grand Trunk Railway.
  56. Gray John C & Co, druggists, 71 Queen.
  57. Greaves Joseph, druggist, 54 Queen.
  58. Green Mrs Phoebe A, fancy gds, 326 Queen.
  59. Green & Co, (John Green), butchers, 152 Queen.
  60. Greenfield Samuel, liquors, 118 Queen,
  61. Hayes Richard, butcher, 38 Queen.
  62. Hickey Mrs Sarah A, butcher, 28 Queen.
  63. Hindmarsh Michael, grocer, 44 Duncan.
  64. Hoare Francis R, grocer, 166 Queen.
  65. Hobbs Samuel, house furngs, 184 Queen.
  66. Holden Abraham, blacksmith, 8 Noble.
  67. Hopkirk Alexander, barber, 60 Queen.
  68. Horsford Anderson, grocer, 328 Queen.
  69. Howard George, blksmith, 6 West Lodge ave.
  70. Hunnard Mrs George, Indry, 4 Melbourne ave.
  71. Huggins Mrs Mary, grocer, 66 Queen.
  72. Hughes Miss Maud, artist, 2 Queen.
  73. Ingham Mrs Harriet A, stationery, 55 Lansdowne ave.
  74. Isaacs J W, tailor, 86 Queen.
  75. Kay Benjamin, undertaker, 69 Queen.
  76. Kelly Daniel J, coal, 16 Queen.
  77. Kelso John, barber, 14 Queen.
  78. King Henry T, stationery, 62 Queen,
  79. King Horace M, milk dealer, 43 Fuller,
  80. King & Edwards (Robert S King, George Edwards), architects, 120 Queen.
  81. Lennox Macbeth & Co (Isaac Lennox, CharlesG andWm J Macbeth) lumber, 94 Queen.
  82. Lynd Adam M, physician, 57 Queen.
  83. McBurney & Co (Jackson A McBurney), lumber, 104 Queen.
  84. McConnell Thomas, vet surgeon, 27 Queen.
  85. McCreary John, butcher, 84 Queen.
  86. McKenzie Thomas, physician, 15Dunn ave.
  87. McLean& Crottie (Allan McLean, Michael J Crottie), drygoods, 50 Queen.
  88. MacMath Hugh, real estate, 53 Queen.
  89. Madox Alfred L, ink mnfr, 11 O'Hara ave.
  90. Mason Wm, blacksmith, 6 Lansdowne ave.
  91. Mearns Robert, florist, 23 Close avp.
  92. Mingay George W, druggist, 154 Queen,
  93. Munns & Co (Wm Munns), drygoods, 34 Queen.
  94. Murdock John Y, banister, 12 Queen.
  95. Mutart Andrew C, shoemaker, 10 Queen.
  96. Oliver Frederick, tailor, 20 Queen. Ontario
  97. Mutual Life, T M Banting, Tofuuto. fioent.
  98. Parkdale Hotel, Roberts & Leslie proprs, 58 Queen.
  99. Parkdale Lumber Mnfg^ and Bld^ Co The, (Limited),
  100. James Stewart pres, W R King secy-treas,*factory West Lodge ave, office 43 Queen.
  101. Prosser James W, painter, 29 Dunn ave.
  102. Ralston Charles,milkdlr,63 WestLodge ave.
  103. Rawcliffe Mrs Rose A, grocer, 64 Queen.
  104. Ray Wm H, real estate, 12 Queen.
  105. Roberts & Leslie (Will B Roberts, George B Leslie) proprs Parkdale Hotel, 58 Queen.
  106. Rogers Frederick C, hats & caps, 41 Queen.
  107. Rowe George G, physician, 129 Queen.
  108. Rumsey Wm H, grocer, 70 Queen.
  109. Scholes Thomas E, hotel junction of King and Queen.
  110. Scobie Wm, boots and shoes, 206 Queen.
  111. Shannon James, milk dir, 7 Prospect ave.
  112. Sharp George, coal, 131 Queen.
  113. Sinclair& Sinclair (George and John A), real estate, 99 Queen
  114. Slaght DW, stationer, 93 Queen.
  115. Slaght Wm H, music, 93 Queen.
  116. Small Wm, butcher, 126 Queen.
  117. Smith Benjamin H, hats & caps, 56 Queen.
  118. Smith Ernest E, wallpaper, 208 Queen.
  119. Snow Henry, baker, 76 Queen.
  120. Snow Richard B, confectioner, 30 Queen.
  121. Southcott George W, tailor, 78 Queen.
  122. Spaulding Albert W, dentist,43 Lansdowne ave.
  123. Squire Thomas, dyer, 7 Union.
  124. Standard Bank of Canada, J Martin agent, 73 Queen.
  125. Stephens Llewellyn A, boots and shoes 42 Queen.
  126. Stewart Wm, builder, 28 Ma]ple Grove.
  127. Stinson John D, shoemaker. 190 Queen.
  128. Sun Life Assurance Co, Robinson Bros agents,
  129. E S Shaw special agent,
  130. W D Vanderburgh general agent.
  131. Swartout Alpheus, grocer, 204 Queen.
  132. Taylor Robert, baker, 7 Callendar.
  133. Taylor & Giles (Agnes Taylor, David A Giles), painters and statrs, 44 Queen.
  134. Temple Peter, boots and shoes, 67 Queen.
  135. Times., The (weekly),A G Gowanlock,propr, 24 Queen.
  136. Tisdale Bradford, baker, 182 Queen.
  137. Todd Thomas W, ticket agent, 40 Queen.
  138. Toplis Charles S, milk dir, 25 Maple Grove.
  139. Toronto Home for Incurables, Mrs Andrew Craigie supt, Dunn ave.
  140. Toronto Stove & Mnfg Co(ltd),J W Fenwick manager, 14 Dufferin.
  141. Turver VVhn W, physic al), 49 Queen
  142. Union Hotel, 1 Queen.
  143. Vernon Eli, livery, 10 West Lodge ave.
  144. Ward J J, tailor, 51 Queen.
  145. Watkins & Son(Wm D and James H), flour and feed, 130 Queen.
  146. Webb W C & Co (Wm C VVebb, George Lewis, George Morgason), butchers, 168 Queen.
  147. Webster George N, milk dir,36Elm Grove.
  148. Weeks Caleb, plumber, 145 Queen.
  149. Westcott Wm, coal, 8 Fuller.
  150. Whillans Robert, stone dealer, 2 Queen.
  151. Wiseman Joseph A, grocer, 212 Queen.
  152. Wood Benjamin W stationer, 108 Queen.
  153. Woods, Miss Catharine,dry gds, 156 Queen.
  154. Wright James, florist, Roncesvalles ave.
  155. Yeoman George E, stoves, 164 Queen.


 

Data from the,
ONTARIO GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS DIRECTORY.

1888-9.

PUBLISHED BIENNIALLY BY

R. L. POLK & CO.

R. L. POLK, J. W. WEEKS, A. DUEEILL,

WEST TORONTO JUNCTION. The people and the place 1888-9.


 

WEST TORONTO JUNCTION. The people and the place 1888-9. OG source

post office and suburb of Toronto

at the junction of the Ontario and Quebec Railway and the CV lines Canadian Pacific Railway in York Township York Co,

4 miles north-west of Toronto,the county seat and nearest banking point.

It contains Methodist, Baptist, Episcopal and Presbyterian churches and a public school,

and has wire-mat and show case factories and other industries.

The CPR ry [Canadian Pacific Railway] yards are located here and give employment to a large number of persons.

A weekly newspaper, the York Tribune, is published.

Population, 2000.

Telegraph, GNW and CPR. Telephone connection.

Express, Dominion and Vickers'. Mail daily.


 


[su_heading style="default" size="16" margin="0"][Noted Persons]


[/su_heading]

1. J S Kirkwood, postmaster.

2. Armstrong R, drygoods.

3. Baker Henry, furniture.

4. Becker Wm, grocer.

5. Blea D, hotel.

6. Brown J C, waggonmaker.

7. Bruce John B, drygoods.

8. Burgess Robert, restaurant.

9. Canada Wire Mattress Co, (M J Murphy,| Charles A Hart).

10. Causey A, grocer.

11. Christie Edward, builder.

12. Clendenan Daniel W, barrister.

13. Clendenan GW, physician.

14. Cordingly J B, general agent.

15. Cotts John, coal and wood.

16. D'Eye H F, grocer.

17. Dominion Show Case Co (George P Wagner, Carl Zeidler and D C Wagner), office furniture and store fittings.

18. Evans John M, flour and feed.

19. Fisher Edward J T, physician.

20. Fisher James A, boots and shoes.

21. Gilmore John T, physician.

22. Gord George, commission merchant.

23. Green Josiah, druggist.

24. Greenwood William, real estate.

25. Hickey James, grocer.

26. Hickey Patrick, general agent.

27. Hickey Mrs Susan, provisions.

28. Hollingshead & McDonald (Wm H Hollingshead, Alexander McDonald), livery.

29. Hollingsicle Wm H, livery.

30. Hoover & Jackson (Jacob H Hoover, James T Jackson), real estate.

31. Hope John, harnessmaker.

32. James Wm, butcher.

33. Johnson Wm, grocer.

34. Joy Robert B, barber.

35. Kirkwood John S, groceries and provisions.

36. Lapp David, builder.

37. Leigh Robert J, books and toys.

38. Lewis H, butcher .

39. Lewis Wm J , poultry dealer.

40. McCormack & Jackson, coal and wood.

41. McFarlane Allan, drygoods.

42. Macuabb & Fowler (Alexander Macnabb) [issue with source image with second name]

43. Madden F, butcher.

44. Mahoney Mrs, confectionery.

45. Mitchell & Rose, dressmakers.

46. MoHlat Mrs M, dressmaker.

47. Parkdale Lumber Mnfg and Building Co (Ltd), James Stewart pres, Georg SinClair sec-treas.

48. Parry Joseph A, blacksmith.

49. Patterson Mrs T, dressmaker.

50. Peaks Thomas J L & Co (Thomas J L and Edwin W Peake), hardware.

51. Pipher Abraham B, builder.

52. Reading Arthur J, artist.

53. Robinson George, baker.

54. Rosebush Wm, grocer.

55. Rowntree John, butcher.

56. Scott Donald, tailor.

57. Shaw Joseph I, milk dealer.

58. Simmonds Henry, poultry dealer.

59. Sinclair Christopher, hotel.

60. Spears John D, builder.

61. Stewart John, sash mfr.

62. Temperance & General Life Assurance Co, J T Jackson agent. (See

63. Veitch John, provisions.

64. Wagner F W & Co (Frederick W and Jacob

65. P Wagner), planing mill.

66. West I & Co (Isaac West), fruits.

67. West J, provisions.

68. Williams Fdward H, land agent.

69. Wilson Charles, butcher.

70. Wilson Wm, real estate.

71. Wonnacott Albert, dairyman.

72. Wylie Wm J, druggist.Junction

Annette Street and Quebec Avenue, To get Traffic Control Signals, maybe


 

Staff is recommending the Installation even though all the requirements have not been met .

The purpose of this report is to obtain approval for the installation of traffic control signals at the intersections of Annette Street and Quebec Avenue.

[su_box title="Traffic Control Signals Annette Street and Quebec Avenue" style="default" box_color="#F73F43" title_color="#FFFFFF" radius="0"]Transportation Services' study results indicate that pedestrian crossing volumes on Annette Street near Quebec Avenue satisfy the minimum criteria to warrant a pedestrian crossover. The results of the traffic control signal warrant indicate that the cross traffic volumes within the intersection are close to satisfying the minimum criteria. Although the warrants for the installation of traffic control signals are not met, Transportation Services staff feel that recommending traffic control signals rather than a pedestrian crossover will provide the enhanced pedestrian protection needed at the intersection of Annette Street and Quebec Avenue..[/su_box]


 

Since the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) operates a transit service on Annette Street, City Council approval of this report is required. TTC staff has been consulted on the matter and as of the time this report was written, TTC have not objected to the proposal.

Annette Street and Quebec Avenue, To get Traffic Control Signals, maybe

Junctioneer online 2008 to 2017 posts by month and by subject



online 2008 to 2017 posts by month and by subject


Http://www.junctioneer.ca/Ju0817/0817/rdi.html


 

Friday, June 8, 2018

Bhutila Karpoche wins Parkdale-High Park,

NDP’s Bhutila Karpoche wins Parkdale-High Park, becoming first Tibetan ever elected to public office in North America.

 

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2018/06/07/karpoche-makes-history-with-ndp-win-becoming-the-first-tibetan-ever-elected-to-public-office-in-north-america.html


Karpoche spent eight years working for DiNovo, first in her constituency office and more recently as her executive assistant at Queen’s Park. DiNovo had wanted to add a Tibetan speaker to her staff to better liaise with Parkdale’s large Tibetan population, so she asked organizers with Students For a Free Tibet if they knew anyone who might be interested. Karpoche arrived and quickly became indispensable, DiNovo said. 

“She knows Queen’s Park and she’s way ahead of the game in terms of what I walked in there with.”

Karpoche, 34, moved to Toronto from Nepal when she was 18, settling into Parkdale, where she became a community organizer. She is fluent in four languages — English, Tibetan, Nepalese and Hindi — and is a PhD candidate at Ryerson University in public health policy.

Free ride bikes in Toronto on Wednesday’s in June.

 

Craig’s Cooke’s on Queen West and Roncy, 100 meters west

Plunge in April New Home Sales Recap


The Altus Group provides a good service to the real estate community, butbi wonder if they consider value of their data beyond the prospect and expected buyers of their data.

community groups with tgeir basuc data would be much better informed.

 

April 2018 GTA New Home Sales Recap

There were 1,727 total new home sales in April 2018, with 502 Low Rise sales, down -65% from April 2017 (down -70% from 10yr avg) and 1,225 High Rise sales, down -65% from April 2017 (down -38% from 10yr avg).


 

As of April 2018, there were 209 active Low Rise sites in the Greater Toronto Area and the total unsold inventory was 4,339 lots. The total number of active High Rise sites was 288, with a total unsold inventory of 9,958 units.

Source

Altus Group

419 adopted by council for the High Park Area

 

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

High Park Apartment Neighbourhood opinion on 419

[su_heading style="default" size="16" margin="0"]HPCA's position is that Amendment #419 should be passed by the EYCC and approved by Toronto Community Council at the end of June
as it will help protect our neighbourhood from overdevelopment. 

These are some of the reasons why we support the amendment:[/su_heading]

 

[su_label type="warning"]Public Space[/su_label] 65% of the total lot area will be open space

"To preserve and enhance the park-like setting, generous open space amenity and soft landscaped areas that contribute to the character of the High Park Apartment Neighbourhood, it is the policy of City Council that:

For sites containing one or more apartment building(s) greater than 4 storeys in height:

  1. A minimum of 65% of the total lot area will be open space, and a maximum of 35% of the total lot area may be covered by buildings and/or above grade structures;

  2. More than half of the required open space will be comprised of soft landscaped area; and

  3. The maximum total building frontage along each street property line will not exceed two thirds of the total lot frontage of each street. If any portion of a building is set back greater than 30 metres from a street property line(s), that portion of building frontage may be excluded from the calculation of total building frontage.


Development/redevelopment will provide a minimum of 2 m2 outdoor amenity space per dwelling unit for all proposed and existing buildings containing 20 or more dwelling units."

 

[su_label type="important"]Built Form[/su_label] existing physical character and enhance the quality of buildings.

To respect the existing physical character and enhance the quality of buildings and open space within and adjacent to the High Park Apartment Neighbourhood, and protect Neighbourhoods from negative impact, it is the policy of City Council that:

Development/redevelopment, including mechanical penthouses, will be required to fit entirely within a 45 degree angular plane measured from the nearest property line(s) of lands designated Neighbourhoods or Parks and Open Space Areas.

Development/redevelopment will be located, massed and designed so that no net new shadows are cast on any lands designated Parks and Open Space Areas as measured between 9:18 a.m. and 6:18 p.m. on March 21 and September 21.

Development/redevelopment will be compatible with the existing built form character of the area and will be encouraged to use simple building forms and massing and limit the number and extent of building step-backs.

Development/redevelopment will include at least one main building entrance located on the prominent street facing building façade so that the entrance is clearly visible and directly accessible from the public street and sidewalk.

A minimum of 25% of all new dwelling units will be two bedroom units or larger; a minimum of 10% of all dwelling new units will be three bedroom units or larger.

Development/redevelopment will be located, massed and designed to limit overlook, provide access to natural light for interior spaces, and maximize opportunities for landscaped open space between buildings through the use of generous building separation distances and rear and side yard setbacks from neighbouring properties.

Big Rude Jake in the Junction, June 29th, 2877 Dundas Street West

Big Rude Jake in the Junction

June 29 3:00 - 23:59


FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE

[su_box title="Events in the Junction!" style="default" box_color="#F73F43" title_color="#FFFFFF" radius="0"]Rod, Gun & Barbers: Junction. 2877 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario M6P 1Y9.[/su_box]

Rod, Gun & Barbers: Junction. 2877 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario M6P 1Y9

Three sets of Jake solo at a retro barber shop that turns into a bar around 8:30 pm. In Toronto's Junction Gardens neighborhood. Good times.

 

Historical Cosplay Events at Toronto History Museums

Historical Cosplay Events
Ever wanted to travel back in time? The Toronto History Museums host a variety of unique cosplay events where guests can immerse themselves in the fashion, music, dance and food of the past. Coming up in June:


[su_note note_color="#FFFF66" text_color="#333333"]

 

Junction Triangle story in The Star Wild Things Festival

Wild ciders, natural wines and funky beers are on the rise

By CHRISTINE SISMONDO

Looks as if Toronto’s in for some pretty wild times this summer.

Well, for one day, at least, with the launch of the Wild Things Festival on June 9 that celebrates low-intervention wine, funky beer and hazy cider at Propeller Coffee Co., 50 Wade Ave. in the Junction Triangle.

https://www.thestar.com/life/2018/06/01/wild-ciders-natural-wines-and-funky-beers-are-on-the-rise.html

I’ve been thinking about it for a while and I feel that wild fermentation is really having a moment in alcohol,” says Crystal Luxmore. “I think it’s kind of a flavour profile for alcohol that we haven’t seen in North America in a long time. I love beer, personally, but what’s really interesting to me was that wild fermentation’s moment cuts across categories — wine, cider and beer.”

Best parking spot at St. Joseph’s Health Center hospital?

Undoubtably the best parking spot at St. Joseph’s health Center is the electric charging station one by the phone company at the front entrance of the Queensway.

You will need a electric car and a flo account to use the station.

The city really needs to pass regulations, of cross charging use and pay as you go, charging stations.


 

 


 


 

TSDB/ school board partners with film union

Release from the school board


 

TDSB Partners with City of Toronto for Filming Pilot

Tuesday, May 29, 2018
Categories: News ReleasesGreat ThingsHappenings @ TDSB

The City of Toronto, in collaboration with the Toronto District School Board and the local screen industry, is launching a new pilot program called xoTO Schools. It will enable enhanced access for location filming at 11 pre-approved TDSB properties and provide opportunities for students to work alongside film and television professionals. 

Mayor John Tory made the announcement today with Councillor Paula Fletcher (Ward 30 Toronto-Danforth), Chair of the Toronto Film, Television and Digital Media Board, alongside TDSB Director of Education John Malloy, TDSB Chair of the Board Robin Pilkey, TDSB Trustee Jennifer Story (Ward 15, Toronto-Danforth) and Victoria Harding, Associate Executive Director of the Directors Guild of Canada – Ontario. 

The xoTO Schools pilot project will run until June 2019.

For more information, read the City of Toronto news release. 

Quick Facts: 

  • Filming at these locations will take place primarily during summer months and on evenings and weekends during the school year;

  • At the pre-approved locations, the scouting and permit application processes will be streamlined with designated permit personnel servicing applications. It will also feature a special daily rate card and a 72-hour permit turnaround timeline;

  • Co-op placements will be created through the academic year in categories such as makeup, hair, sound, special effects, props, set decoration, costume design, continuity, lighting, grip, construction, paint and transportation.

Release from the NABET 700-M UNIFOR 

June 1, 2018

xoTO Schools Pilot Project Announcement

We are proud to announce that on Tuesday, May 29th, 2018, the City, in collaboration with the TDSB and the local screen industry, launched the xoTO Schools Pilot Project to enable enhanced access for location filming at 11 pre-approved TDSB sites as well as interactive educational opportunities for students.

NABET 700-M UNIFOR played a key role in establishing the pilot program, and was heavily involved in the recruitment and placement of its first co-op students on NABET 700-M UNIFOR signatory productions.

The xoTO Schools Pilot Project has been created to facilitate access to 11 pre-approved TDSB sites with an expedited permitting system, set daily rate cards and access to TDSB parking lots for production trucks,

 

all the while creating meaningful co-op placement opportunities for TDSB students in film productions and through industry experiences.

 

Filming at these locations will take place primarily during summer months and on evenings and weekends during the school year. At the pre-approved locations, the scouting and permit application processes will be streamlined with designated permit personnel servicing applications. It will also feature a special daily rate card a 72-hour permit turnaround timeline.

 

Photo from the union,


 


 

 

 


Launch of the xoTO Schools Pilot Project - Results
Board Decision

The Toronto Film, Television, and Digital Media Board received the item for information.
Decision Advice and Other Information
The Co-chair, Toronto Film, Television, and Digital Media Board, gave a verbal presentation on the launch of the xoTO Schools Pilot Project to the Toronto Film, Television, and Digital Media Board.
Summary
Report from the Chair, Toronto Film, Television, and Digital Media Board, on the launch of the xoTO Schools Pilot Project.
Motions
Motion to Receive Item moved by Monty Montgomerie (Carried)
That the item be received for information.


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