Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Safe rail fundraiser June 1st Vine Parkette.

A long tail of 20,000 companies below the top 100 produced half of all growth. Ads would be hopelessly ex-pensive so driving demand would be im-possible.No large retailer would stock it. The growth of «just-in-time» manufacturing means start-ups no longer need to splurge on inventory.

Other service providers can pass on economies of scale once available only to consumer-goods giants.Lumi, a packaging firm, uses a network of factories to design and produce packaging for small brands. It represents thousands of brands so can get better prices. Businesses such as ShipBob, a Chicago startup,do something similar with ship-ping, allowing small brands to offer faster, cheaper deliveries.

The costs are high but it gives them access to the online giant's shipping services and huge user base.Many of the big firms have, by con-trast, been reluctant to sell on the giant's website, so feature low in search rankings. More of them have started selling on Ama-zon in recent years, says R.J. Hottovy of Morningstar, a research firm, but it still represents a small slice of their sales. He sold $50,000 of snacks and then, on the basis of data gleaned, Blake's Seed Based changed its recipe and relaunched in September.

m Gemi, an on-line seller of posh shoes, offers new de-signs weekly so can respond precisely to consumer demands. Their giant rivals, by contrast, use data filtered by retailers. Consumer-goods behemoths are well aware of the threat posed by microbrand ankle-biters. One response is to buy them.

Nestlé's acquisition in 2017 of Blue Bottle, a hip Californian coffee brand, bought it ex-posure to new market segments. Competition is fierce to buy the best mi-crobrands so big firms may overpay for their acquisition, says Mr Hottovy. Other big firms are trying to grow their own brands. Earlier this year Kraft Heinz launched Spring-board, an incubator for small,disruptive food and drink brands.

In the long term some small brands will be swallowed up but others will be encour-aged, argues Sonali De Rycker of Accel, a venture-capital firm. More will want to re-main independent for longer, or entirely, which will mean larger deals or ipos.

Micro firms out position bigger firms according to am

 

 

A long tail of 20,000 companies below the top 100 produced half of all growth. Ads would be hopelessly ex-pensive so driving demand would be im-possible. No large retailer would stock it. The growth of «just-in-time» manufacturing means start-ups no longer need to splurge on inventory.

Other service providers can pass on economies of scale once available only to consumer-goods giants. Lumi, a packaging firm, uses a network of factories to design and produce packaging for small brands. It represents thousands of brands so can get better prices. Businesses such as ShipBob, a Chicago startup, do something similar with ship-ping, allowing small brands to offer faster, cheaper deliveries.

The costs are high but it gives them access to the online giant's shipping services and huge user base. Many of the big firms have, by con-trast, been reluctant to sell on the giant's website, so feature low in search rankings. More of them have started selling on Ama-zon in recent years, says R.J. Hottovy of Morningstar, a research firm, but it still represents a small slice of their sales. He sold $50,000 of snacks and then, on the basis of data gleaned, Blake's Seed Based changed its recipe and relaunched in September.

m Gemi, an on-line seller of posh shoes, offers new de-signs weekly so can respond precisely to consumer demands. Their giant rivals, by contrast, use data filtered by retailers. Consumer-goods behemoths are well aware of the threat posed by microbrand ankle-biters. One response is to buy them.

Nestlé's acquisition in 2017 of Blue Bottle, a hip Californian coffee brand, bought it ex-posure to new market segments. Competition is fierce to buy the best mi-crobrands so big firms may overpay for their acquisition, says Mr Hottovy. Other big firms are trying to grow their own brands. Earlier this year Kraft Heinz launched Spring-board, an incubator for small, disruptive food and drink brands.

In the long term some small brands will be swallowed up but others will be encour-aged, argues Sonali De Rycker of Accel, a venture-capital firm. More will want to re-main independent for longer, or entirely, which will mean larger deals or ipos.

Will the city create three or four community council advisory boards?

A discussion paper released Wednesday urges the city to create three or four community council advisory boards across the city each composed of about 20 appointed citizens who would make recommendations to community councils and refer contentious planning applications to a new city mediation office.

Currently, Toronto is divided into four areas each represented by a community council — Etobicoke York, North York, Scarborough, and Toronto and East York. Councillors sit on the community council that their ward is in, hold public hearings and make decisions and recommendations on local planning matters. Most decisions made at community council end up going to city council for final approval.

Community council advisory boards would reduce councillors’ workloads by filtering through the number of deputations that go before community councils, said one of the paper’s authors, planner Beate Bowron, who wrote it alongside community activist Sue Dexter and political scientist Gary Davidson. They urged the city to form a task force to consult with the public on how these citizen-driven groups should be structured. 

“These are suggestions to feed into public discourse. We are not pretending we have all the answers,” said Bowron. 

The authors were motivated to write the paper because “we thought there was potentially a huge democractic deficit (with 25 councillors). The fear is the access of the community to councillors will be severely diminished,” said Bowron.

The paper also suggests consolidating city council’s 14 committees into three groups with seven to nine councillors on each, and replacing some of the 91 councillor appointments on the city’s 37 agencies, boards and commissions with citizens.

“We are not by any means saying those big important boards (like Toronto Transit Commission) should have no councillors on them, but might need to have fewer,” Bowron said. Some of the nine councillors on the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, for example, could be filled with citizens. 

Tory must push for these kinds of changes if he wants to have an effective second term, said Gabriel Eidelman, a University of Toronto urban policy professor, who was part of a team that made recommendations in 2017 on how city council could improve decision-making.

mayor said he is open to more citizens participating in city government

The mayor said he is open to more citizens participating in city government, potentially filling spots on city boards, agencies and corporations.

“Having accomplished citizens come and be part of those discussions on boards and for that matter at the community level would not only be good for governance in terms of producing better results but would help alleviate some of the load on councillors who are now overseeing much bigger wards,” Tory said.

He also wants the city to strengthen its 311 and online services so councillors can spend less time tackling constituent problems and more time developing public policy.

“I am hopeful this will help us speed up ... substantially altering the way citizens interact with their government,” Tory said.

Guy friends

To my guy friends, if you're on a dating site looking for meaningful, potentially long-term connection, try to avoid these pitfalls which could work against attracting anything remotely close to that. First impressions really do count; plenty of time later for partners to read between the lines on your quirks and habits - while you're getting the read on theirs:

1.) Take the damn sunglasses off. Seriously, show your eyes. You may think it looks cool (especially those colored ones which resemble a gas leak on the surface of a lake) but it raises suspicion and questions.

2.) Again along the theme of eyes, don't wear reptilian slit contact lenses. That's creepy as sh*t as a first impression, and will send anybody afraid of the Cabal or NWO packing. You won't even have them at hello!

3.) No selfies in front of police stations. If you're not wearing a uniform, nobody knows the real backstory to that. Make sense?

4.) The worst pitfall of all! Take a solo selfie without the ex, BFF drinking buddy, wife, or "it's complicated" special friend who's only really renting a room in your place to help with costs. And don't cut her body off and leave an arm or hand wrapped around your head, shoulder, waist, as* ... yeah, you catch the drift.

5.) For God sakes, delete the super blurry pics where nobody can tell if you're a human or bigfoot standing in a forest! Don't be so freakin' lazy about your sales pitch!

6.) Leave the bottle (or bottles!) of beer, wine, sitting on the table - or at the very least, try to frame it/them creatively or gracefully. Guzzling shots/bottles, or wearing torn, empty beer cases on your head while booze seeps down the front of your shirt sends out a very specific message for a very specific partner ... which is cool if that's what you're looking for, but not so cool if you've arrived at a point in your life where you'd like to regenerate your liver.

7.) Try your absolute best not to look super bored, hungover, pissed off, or like a dangerous sociopath. If you prefer your serious face, practice in front of the mirror, and solicit feedback from others you trust (who aren't competing on the same dating site!)

8.) Please. Don't post pictures of arm wrestling a concrete gargoyle or wearing tin foil on your head with your eyes severely crossed. Save the conversation (and collection of pictures) about your eccentricities for the time-wasting messages which will inevitably come next. If you find your fellow weirdo, rock on. Consider yourself lucky!

9.) Don't include any pics of tightly hugging a child who is crying. That's another "nobody knows the backstory" deal, and you could be falsely accused of something.

10.) There are other sites perfect for profiles of X-rated bare body parts. If you like your physique, that's awesome ... somebody else probably will too, but include your face (without sunglasses) and retain a bit of mystery.

11.) Avoid pictures which show exactly where you work, live, etc. Online is a w-w-weird place. Keep it less w-w-weird by minimizing what gets out until you've had a chance to filter your prospects thoroughly.

12.) Come on! Don't post a main profile shot of you with messy (not to be confused with "sexy") hair, laying in bed! Or, on a couch. Sexy is tousled and probably smells nice. Messy is greasy, buckled up into confusing directions, and may not smell so nice. Don't we all see enough of that on a regular basis anyway if we're with someone? Or even in our own mirror? Zero points on originality. You can't plus-sell on inevitability, so don't include it.

Maybe next week I'll write a list of 12 things that really, really work well!



driverless passenger vans and retail vehicles

FOOD FOR THOUGHT The United Nations World Geospatial Information Congress was held in China's Deqing County in November and included driverless passenger vans and retail vehicles, like the mini-market above.

last public meeting on new policies for streets, parks, open spaces and building design Dec. 11th


CityplanTO a @CityPlanTO 17h















Don't miss it! Our last public meeting on new policies for





streets, parks, open spaces and building design is on





December 11, 2018. Drop by Metro Hall Rooms 308/309 from





6230-9130pm to learn more and share your thoughts with us.


Toronto Rehab

University Health Network (UHN) - Toronto Rehab, will be holding an Open House and 
Pre-application meeting to discuss with the community their proposed plans for expanding the Lakeside Long Term Care Centre at 150 Dunn Avenue.

UHN is aiming for construction to begin during the summer of 2020, and be completed in the fall of 2022. But, before construction would start, they need to go through an approvals process with the City. They intend to submit an application to the City early in 2019.

Councillor Perks and City Planning staff will be in attendance. If you
are unable to attend the meeting and are interested in providing comment
and/or receiving more detailed information, please email Councillor Perks
office at councillor_perks@toronto.ca.
1499 Queen St. W. (ParkdalePlace: 
Time:Date:

 Wednesday, Dec. 12th, 2018  5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. (view panels and presentation starts at 6:30 p.m.) Activity-Recreation Centre - PARC) 

Report offers path forward for 25-member Toronto city counci

Report offers path forward for 25-member Toronto city council

JEFF GRAYTORONTO CITY HALL REPORTERPUBLISHED 18 HOURS AGOUPDATED NOVEMBER 28, 2018  COMMENTS

City Hall in Toronto on Feb. 6, 2018.

FRED LUM/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Toronto’s smaller city council must streamline its committee structure and cut the number of politicians assigned to oversee everything from its transit agency to its zoo, according to a staff report.

The new council – slashed to 25 members from 44 in the middle of the election campaign by Ontario Premier Doug Ford – meets next week for the first time since the Oct. 22 vote. At the meeting, councillors are set to debate a long list of recommendations on how council should work drawn up by city manager Chris Murray and city clerk Ulli Watkiss and released on Wednesday.

Previously, Toronto city councillors filled hundreds of seats on boards, commissions and agencies across the city – overseeing everything from hockey arenas to community theatres. They also sat on various committees at City Hall that do everything from scour the city’s $11-billion operating budget to approve new parking spots.

The report calls for a series of temporary reforms, including consolidating council’s seven standing committees into just four, while setting up a new special committee of council to study permanent changes to the way council operates.

However, some councillors feared the proposals would hand too much power to Mayor John Tory.

Councillor Gord Perks, who represents Ward 4 (Parkdale-High Park) and is a left-leaning critic of the mayor, points out the report calls for cutting the number of council-appointed who sit on a long list of bodies, including the boards of Toronto Community Housing Corp. and the Toronto Public Library, but the proposal also maintains the mayor’s ability to appoint a member to such boards as his designate.

That, Mr. Perks says, effectively strengthens the mayor at the expense of council: “If you apply what I always call the Rob Ford test, which is when you had a mayor who couldn’t function and council had to take over his role, do you want to give new powers to that guy?”

He criticized Premier Ford for imposing the 25-member structure on the city, which Mr. Perks argues will only make Toronto politicians more removed from their constituents as they deal with citizen complaints and contentious high-rise development applications in wards that are now twice as large, with an average population of 110,000.

Councillor Paula Fletcher (Ward 14, Toronto-Danforth), who like Mr. Perks is to the left of Mr.Tory, said she is concerned the smaller council and new structure will make it harder to oversee the city’s various agencies, some of which spend hundreds of millions of dollars, as well as the city’s own operations with just four standing committees.

“This is direct product of the … Ford meddling in the city,” she said. “We’re having to shrink some of our accountability functions.”

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Mr. Tory, addressing reporters at a groundbreaking ceremony for the massive Port Lands flood-protection project on Wednesday, said he believed the staff report is a thoughtful approach to restructuring council.

The mayor also repeated his call for an increase in councillors’ $240,000 staffing budgets so they can hire more aides to help manage their much-larger wards.

“The number of people being served, which is close to three million in the city of Toronto, has not changed,” he said. “They still need customer service, constituency service. There are now fewer people to serve them.”

The staff report lays out four options regarding council staff and office budgets. Keeping the current staffing levels for councillor aides would save $7.4-million compared with 2018. But it is widely expected that council will approve increases, potentially all but eliminating the $25.5-million over four years that Mr. Ford promised his reduction in council size would save.

Asked on Wednesday at a news conference whether a move to boost councillors’ budgets negates the promised benefits of his plan, Mr. Ford asserted that the cut to council would end up saving millions in “efficiencies.”

Gabriel Eidelman, an assistant professor at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, says he hopes the appointment of a special committee to reform council means the committee takes another look at the changes he and a group of experts – including former councillors and senior civil servants – recommended last year to make council run more smoothly.

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Among them were procedural changes that would limit the ability of councillors to spend lengthy periods asking questions of city staff at council meetings, and require mayors to give a kind of annual throne speech to clearly outline their priorities.

“This can’t just be what’s presented here, about rearranging the deck chair,” Dr. Eidelman said. “ … We should take this opportunity to think more deeply about what the city needs going forward.”

Recalibrating City Council's Governance System for 26 Members

Recalibrating City Council's Governance System for 26 MembersCommunications CC1.1.1 to CC1.1.23 have been submitted on this Item.Public Notice GivenOrigin(November 26, 2018) Report from the City Manager and the City Clerk Recommendations

The City Manager and the City Clerk recommend that:


 

Special Committee on Governance


 

1. City Council establish a Special Committee on Governance with the following terms of reference:


 

a. The Special Committee will consider the impacts on the City's governance structure and processes arising from the reduction in the size of Council and make recommendations to City Council on any further changes to its governance structure.


 

b. The Special Committee will establish a work plan and engagement process for the governance review.


 

c. The Special Committee is composed of the Mayor or Council Member-designate appointed by the Mayor as Chair and four Council Members appointed by City Council on the recommendation of the Striking Committee.


 

d. The Special Committee reports directly to City Council.


 

e. Meetings of the Special Committee will be held at the call of the Chair.


 

f. The Special Committee will conduct its proceedings in accordance with Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27, Council Procedures. The Committee's meetings will be open to the public and will comply with the Open Meeting Requirements of the City of Toronto Act, 2006.


 

g. The City Manager and the City Clerk will provide policy, research and engagement support to the Special Committee.


 

h. The City Clerk will provide meeting management support to the Special Committee.


 

i. The Special Committee's mandate will end when it makes its final recommendations to City Council.


 

Interim committee structure


 

2. City Council adopt the following interim committee structure and mandates and amend Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27, Council Procedures, accordingly:


 

a. Four Standing Committees composed of six members and the Mayor by right-of-office:


 

1. Community and Economic Development Committee - The Community and Economic Development Committee's primary focus is on social cohesion and the economy, with a mandate to monitor and make recommendations on strengthening communities, neighbourhoods and the economy.


 

2. General Government and Licensing Committee - The General Government and Licensing Committee's primary focus is on City government assets and resources and business licensing, with a mandate to monitor and make recommendations on the administrative operations of the City and the licensing of businesses.


 

3. Infrastructure and Environment Committee - The Infrastructure and Environment Committee's primary focus is on infrastructure and the natural environment, with a mandate to monitor and make recommendations on Toronto's infrastructure needs and services, parks and forestry and the sustainable use of Toronto's environment.


 

4. Planning and Housing Committee - The Planning and Housing Committee's primary focus is on urban form and housing development, with a mandate to monitor and make recommendations on planning, property standards, growth and housing development.


 

b. Executive Committee is composed of eight members as follows: 


 

1. the Mayor
2. the Deputy Mayor 
3. the four Standing Committee Chairs

4. the Budget Committee Chair to be appointed by the Mayor

5. one Member at-large who is a Member of Council appointed by Council


 

If the Mayor appoints the First Deputy Mayor as a Standing Committee Chair, City Council will appoint another Member of Council as an at-large member.


 

c. Executive Committee's mandate is amended by removing human resources policy (as this is now part of the General Government and Licensing Committee's mandate) and by adding the following:


 

1. Providing strategic policy direction and receiving routine updates on collective bargaining relating to the City.


 

2. Providing strategic direction to staff in negotiating City collective agreements and considering updates on the progress of collective bargaining.


 

3. The Executive Committee or any sub-committee struck for these purposes is not an alternative to established employee and union dispute-resolution mechanisms.


 

d. Employee and Labour Relations Committee is deleted from the list of special committees.


 

e. Striking Committee is reduced from seven Council Members to five Council Members including the Mayor as Chair, or the Deputy Mayor as Chair if so assigned by the Mayor and the restriction that prohibits Striking Committee members from being appointed to more than one of the Civic Theatres Toronto Board or the Toronto Police Services Board is deleted.

f. Civic Appointments Committee is reduced from nine Council Members to five Council Members including the Mayor or Mayor's designate as Chair appointed by the Mayor.


 

g. Budget Committee is reduced from six Council Members to five Council Members and the restriction that prohibits Budget Committee members from being members of the Audit Committee is deleted.


 

h. Audit Committee is reduced from six Council Members to five Council Members and the restrictions that prohibit Audit Committee members from being a Committee Chair or a member of the Budget Committee are deleted.


 

3. City Council amend Section 27-126C of the Council Procedures, headed "Delegated Duties of Standing Committees", to reflect that under the interim committee structure, the Planning and Housing Committee and the General Government and Licensing Committee will exercise the authority previously delegated to the Planning and Growth Management Committee and the Government Management Committee in this Section, as applicable.


 

Community Council boundaries


 

4. City Council amend the now redundant provisions of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27, Council Procedures by adopting the following new community council boundaries:


 

a. Etobicoke York Community Council:


 

- Ward 1 - Etobicoke North

- Ward 2 - Etobicoke Centre

- Ward 3 - Etobicoke-Lakeshore

- Ward 5 - York South-Weston

- Ward 7 - Humber River-Black Creek


 

b. North York Community Council:


 

- Ward 6 - York Centre

- Ward 8 - Eglinton-Lawrence

- Ward 15 - Don Valley West

- Ward 16 - Don Valley East

- Ward 17 - Don Valley North

- Ward 18 - Willowdale


 

c. Scarborough Community Council:


 

- Ward 20 - Scarborough Southwest

- Ward 21 - Scarborough Centre

- Ward 22 - Scarborough-Agincourt

- Ward 23 - Scarborough North

- Ward 24 - Scarborough-Guildwood

- Ward 25 - Scarborough-Rouge Park


 

d. Toronto and East York Community Council:


 

- Ward 4 - Parkdale-High Park

- Ward 9 - Davenport

- Ward 10 - Spadina-Fort York

- Ward 11 - University-Rosedale

- Ward 12 - Toronto-St. Paul's

- Ward 13 - Toronto Centre

- Ward 14 - Toronto-Danforth

- Ward 19 - Beaches-East York


 

Council member appointments


 

5. City Council reduce the appointments of Council Members to the boards, committees and external bodies outlined below and City Council amend the relevant City By-laws including chapters of the Toronto Municipal Code, Relationship Frameworks and Shareholder Directions accordingly:


 

a. Artscape Toronto Board of Directors – reduce by one Council Member;


 

b. Canadian National Exhibition Association, Municipal Section – reduce appointments by 11 Council Members and City Council request the City Manager and the City Clerk to review the composition of the Municipal Section;


 

c. Civic Theatres Toronto Board of Directors – reduce by two Council Members by deleting the two ward-specific appointments and also delete the requirement that one Member be a member of a specific committee;


 

d. CreateTO Board of Directors – reduce by one Council Member and City Council also delete the requirement that Members be from different Community Councils;


 

e. Debenture Committee – remove the Deputy Mayor;


 

f. Heritage Toronto Board of Directors – reduce by one Council Member;


 

g. Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee – reduce by two Council Members;


 

h. Toronto Atmospheric Fund Board of Directors – reduce by two Council Members;


 

i. Toronto Community Housing Corporation Board of Directors – reduce by one Council Member;


 

j. Toronto Preservation Board - reduce by two Council Members;


 

k. Toronto Public Library Board – reduce by two Council Members;


 

l. Toronto Transit Commission Board of Directors – reduce by two Council Members; and


 

m. Toronto Zoo Board of Management – reduce by one Council Member.


 

6. City Council convert Council Member appointments to public or staff appointments as outlined below:


 

a. Design Exchange Board of Directors – convert the two Council Member appointments to two public members;


 

b. FoodShare Board of Directors – convert the Council Member appointment to a staff appointment and authorize the City Manager to appoint a staff member representative to the Board;


 

c. George R. Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Art Board of Trustees – convert the one Council Member appointment to a public member;


 

d. Golden Horseshoe Food and Farming Alliance – convert the one Council Member appointment plus alternate to a staff appointment and authorize the City Manager to appoint a staff member representative and alternate to the Alliance;


 

e. Harbourfront Centre Board of Directors – convert the three Council Member appointments to one Council Member and two public members;


 

f. Toronto and Region Conservation Authority Board – convert four Council Member appointments to public members so that Council will appoint five Council Members and nine public members;


 

g. Toronto Arts Council – convert the five Council Member appointments to two Council Members and three public members;


 

h. Toronto Financial Services Alliance – convert the appointment of the Mayor or designate and the Chair of the Economic Development Committee to two public members; and


 

i. York Employees’ Pension and Benefit Fund Committee, and for consistency with the other Pension Plan Boards, City Council appoint the City Manager or designate and the Chief Financial Officer or designate as voting members by-right-of-position (two positions).


 

7. City Council discontinue the appointment of Members of Council to the following City bodies and in lieu of board membership direct that the Councillor for the ward where the facility or organization is located be entitled to notice, agendas and minutes for all meetings and be entitled to attend all meetings of the Board, including closed sessions and City Council amend the relevant chapters of the Toronto Municipal Code accordingly:


 

a. 70 Berkeley Street Community Centre (University Alumnae Dramatic Club) (one position);


 

b. 192 Carlton Street (Second Mile Club) (one position);


 

c. Balmy Beach Park Board of Management (one position);


 

d. Community Preservation Panels (nine positions);


 

e. Haven Toronto Board of Directors (one position); and


 

f. University Settlement Community Centre Committee (one position).


 

8. City Council discontinue the appointment of Members of Council to the following City bodies and external bodies:


 

a. 12 Alexander Street Theatre Project Board of Directors (one position);


 

b. Canadian Film Centre Board of Directors (one position);


 

c. Canadian Stage Company Board of Directors (two positions);


 

d. Crescent Town Recreation Club Inc. Board of Directors (one position);


 

e. Dora Mavor Moore Awards Board of Directors (one position);


 

f. East York Foundation Nominating Committee (one position);


 

g. Greater Toronto Marketing Alliance (one position);


 

h. Guild Renaissance Group Board of Directors (one position);


 

i. Homes First Society (one position);


 

j. L’Association francaise des municipalites de l’Ontario/Association of Francophone Municipalities of Ontario (one position);


 

k. Occupational Health and Safety Coordinating Committee (one position);


 

l. Ontario Good Roads Association Board of Directors effective February 26, 2020 when the current Council Member appointee's term ends (one position);


 

m. Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Board of Governors (one position);


 

n. Ryerson Centre Board of Directors (one position);


 

o. Salvation Army Toronto Grace Health Centre Board of Trustees (one position);


 

p. Scarborough Arts Council (one position);


 

q. Thistletown Multi-Service Centre Board of Management (one position);


 

r. Toronto and Region Conservation Authority Regional Watershed Alliance – optional Municipal Representative (one position);


 

s. Toronto Business Development Centre Board of Directors (one position);


 

t. Toronto Foundation for Student Success (one position);


 

u. Toronto Symphony Board of Directors (one position);


 

v. Town of York Historical Society (one position);


 

w. UrbanArts Community Arts Council (two positions);


 

x. York Community Information (one position);


 

y. Young Ambassadors Selection Committee for Learnx Foundation (one position); and


 

z. Young People’s Theatre Board of Directors (two positions).


 

9. City Council amend the composition of the Arena and Community Centre Boards of Management in Chapter 25 of the former Toronto Municipal Code, and former Leaside By-law 1374, as amended to provide that:


 

a. the Councillor for the Ward in which an Arena or Community Centre is located shall be a member of the board by-right-of-office;


 

b. Ward Councillor positions shall be excluded from the calculation to determine quorum of the board, consistent with the relationship frameworks for arenas and community centres; and


 

c. despite Part 9.b above, a ward councillor attending a meeting of a board may be counted in order to achieve quorum,


 

and City Council authorize the City Solicitor to submit a Bill to Council to re-enact Chapter 25 of the former Toronto Municipal Code and the applicable provisions in former Leaside By-law 1374, as a new chapter of the current Municipal Code.


 

10. City Council amend the composition of its Business Improvement Area Boards of Management to provide that Councillors for the ward(s) in which a Business Improvement Area is located shall be members of the board by-right-of-office and that Chapter 19 of the Toronto Municipal Code be amended accordingly.


 

Public member appointments


 

11. City Council adopt the following new process for the screening, interviewing and recommending of public appointees to agencies, corporations and tribunals, and the Public Appointments Policy be amended accordingly:


 

a. the Civic Appointments Committee will screen, interview and recommend to City Council public appointments to the following agency boards:


 

1. Board of Health;

2. Exhibition Place Board of Governors;

3. Ports Toronto;

4. Toronto Investment Board;

5. Toronto Parking Authority;

6. Toronto Police Services Board;

7. Toronto Public Library;

8. Toronto and Region Conservation Authority;

9. Toronto Transit Commission; and

10. Toronto Zoo;


 

b. the Mayor's Corporations Nominating Panel will screen, interview and recommend to City Council public appointments to the following boards:


 

1. CreateTO;

2. Metropolitan Toronto Convention Centre;

3. Toronto Community Housing Corporation;

4. Toronto Hydro; and

5. Waterfront Toronto;


 

c. City Council establish a Tribunals Nominating Panel with the following Terms of Reference:


 

1. The Tribunals Nominating Panel is a roster composed of up to nine public members; members from the roster will convene in panels as determined by the City Clerk;


 

2. The Tribunals Nominating Panel will screen, interview and recommend to City Council public appointments to the following Quasi-Judicial Bodies and Tribunals:


 

a. Administrative Penalty Tribunal;

b. Committee of Adjustment;

c. Compliance Audit Committee;

d. Dangerous Dog Tribunal;

e. Property Standards Committee;

f. Rooming House Commissioner;

g. Sign Variance Committee;

h. Toronto Licensing Tribunal; and

i. Toronto Local Appeal Body;


 

3. The City Clerk will recruit the Tribunals Nominating Panel members in accordance with the provisions of the Public Appointments Policy and will recommend the appointment of members to City Council; City Council appoints the Chair;


 

4. The Tribunals Nominating Panel will conduct proceedings in accordance with Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27, Council Procedures; Panel meetings will begin and end in public and will comply with the Open Meeting Requirements of the City of Toronto Act, 2006;


 

5. The City Clerk provides policy support to the Tribunals Nominating Panel;


 

6. The City Clerk provides meeting management support to the Tribunals Nominating Panel; and


 

7. The Tribunals Nominating Panel submit recommendations to City Council through the City Clerk.


 

d. City Council authorize the City Clerk to screen, interview and recommend the balance of the public appointments to City Council through the Civic Appointments Committee, or to Community Council where public appointments have been delegated.


 

12. City Council approve a per diem for Tribunals Nominating Panel Members of $250 per half-day to a maximum of $5,000 per calendar year pro-rated on an annual basis from the time of appointment and direct the Chief Financial Officer to include a budget of $45,000 for this purpose in the 2019 budget.


 

Transition provisions


 

13. City Council direct that as a transition provision, bills previously authorized by a Community Council decision made under delegated authority shall be submitted to and enacted by the Community Council having geographic jurisdiction for the matter effective December 1, 2018.


 

14. City Council amend Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 169, City Officials to authorize the City Solicitor, in consultation with the City Clerk, to submit bills to City Council to update the Municipal Code to reflect organizational or governance changes, to refresh chapters for readability, accessible and clear language and to reflect current code style.


 

15. City Council authorize the City Manager to execute and deliver to their respective chief executive officers amendments to the Shareholder Directions of the various corporations that reflect City Council's decision, in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.

Summary

The Province of Ontario's Better Local Government Act, 2018, reduced the number of Toronto's municipal wards and Councillors to 25 from 47 previously approved by City Council for the 2018 to 2022 term and 44 in the previous term. This will place increased demands on Council Members' time to carry out both their legislative and constituency duties. City Councillors now serve wards of significantly larger geographic size and up to double the number of constituents.


 

City Council's governance structure is currently calibrated for 45 Members (the Mayor and 44 Councillors) and would be challenged to remain effective and sustainable with 26 Members.


 

Without changes to the governance structure, Council Members would: 

  • Hold 97 seats on 14 Council committees (Standing Committees, Executive Committee and special committees);
  • Hold 388 seats on 170 City and external boards;
  • Interview more than 900 public members for 450 appointees to City boards and committees;
  • Experience difficulty attending all required meetings, potentially causing quorum issues and impairing the ability of committees and boards to function effectively; and
  • Establish an Executive Committee of 13 members representing half of the new City Council and potentially impacting the role of City Council as the final decision-making body.

Also, the new ward boundaries make the existing boundaries of Community Councils redundant. No meetings of Community Councils can be held, including statutory hearings under the Planning Act, until City Council adopts new boundaries.


 

To address these challenges, the City Manager and the City Clerk recommend City Council: 

  • Adopt an interim committee structure closely modelled on the existing structure but recalibrated for 26 Council Members;
  • Establish a Special Committee on Governance composed of five Council Members to review City Council's governance structure, including how the interim structure is functioning, and make any necessary recommendations to City Council;
  • Adopt new Community Council boundaries reflecting City Council's June 2018 decision;
  • Reduce the number of Council Member appointments to City boards and committees and external bodies to better manage demands on Council Members' time for meetings; and
  • Amend the public appointments process to boards, committees and tribunals to reduce demands on Council Members' time for interview panels and to ensure public member vacancies and expired terms can be filled in a timely fashion.

Background Information(November 26, 2018) Report from the City Manager and the City Clerk on Recalibrating City Council's Governance System for 26 Members (CC1.1) 
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-122083.pdf)
Attachment 1 - Summary of Proposed Council Member Appointments based on Recommended Approach 
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-122084.pdf)
Attachment 2 - Mixed Approach to Screen and Interview Public Appointment Candidates 
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-122085.pdf)
Attachment 3 - Summary of Market Rents by Ward 
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-122086.pdf)
(November 28, 2018) Public Notice on Changes to the Governance Structure and Community Council Boundaries - Amendments to Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 27, Council Procedures 
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-122103.pdf)
Communications(November 23, 2018) E-mail from Teresa Hannigan (CC.Main.CC1.1.1) 
(November 15, 2018) E-mail from Ric Amis, Secretary, Parkdale Residents Association (CC.Main.CC1.1.2) 
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/comm/communicationfile-87961.pdf
(November 23, 2018) E-mail from Judy Love (CC.Main.CC1.1.3) 
(November 24, 2018) E-mail from John Klassen (CC.Main.CC1.1.4) 
(November 24, 2018) E-mail from Arthur H. Watson (CC.Main.CC1.1.5) 
(November 24, 2018) E-mail from Marco Bertucci (CC.Main.CC1.1.6) 
(November 20, 2018) Letter from David Harrison, Chair and Henry Wiercinski, Annex Residents' Association and Gail Misra, Chair and Sue Dexter, Harbord Village Residents' Association on behalf of 55 Residents' Associations (CC.Main.CC1.1.7) 
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/comm/communicationfile-87966.pdf
(November 24, 2018) E-mail from Chris Townsend (CC.Main.CC1.1.8) 
(November 24, 2018) E-mail from Zoe Donoahue (CC.Main.CC1.1.9) 
(November 24, 2018) E-mail from Philip Webb (CC.Main.CC1.1.10) 
(November 25, 2018) E-mail from Therese Beaupre (CC.Main.CC1.1.11) 
(November 25, 2018) E-mail from Susan Weatherseed (CC.Main.CC1.1.12) 
(November 25, 2018) E-mail from Ken Girotti (CC.Main.CC1.1.13) 
(November 25, 2018) E-mail from Jeff D. Derksen (CC.Main.CC1.1.14) 
(November 25, 2018) E-mail from Robin Budd (CC.Main.CC1.1.15) 
(November 25, 2018) E-mail from Susan Berry (CC.Main.CC1.1.16) 
(November 26, 2018) E-mail from Pam Hyde (CC.Main.CC1.1.17) 
(November 26, 2018) E-mail from Mary Louise Squissato (CC.Main.CC1.1.18) 
(November 26, 2018) E-mail from Jun Nogami (CC.Main.CC1.1.19) 
(November 27, 2018) E-mail from Mark Field (CC.Main.CC1.1.20) 
(November 27, 2018) E-mail from Sara Cowan (CC.Main.CC1.1.21) 
(October 25, 2018) E-mail from Don Pratt (CC.Main.CC1.1.22) 
(November 28, 2018) E-mail from Tina Leslie (CC.Supp.CC1.1.23

The theatre space on Queen West by Duffern.



 

 

 

 
[[People with disabilities face very specific challenges]]


, often contributing to victimization, including: • Increased risk, or perception of increased vulnerability • Lack of resources or support systems • Absolute dependence on an abusive partner or caregiver



Lack of independence in finances, housing, or transportation • Physical or social isolation Once victimized, barriers to the justice continue with: • Lower rates of police follow-up, prosecution, and conviction of perpetrators • Physical and cognitive barriers to the judicial system, including difficulties accessing courtrooms or other facilities if the crime is prosecuted • Mistaken belief that people with disabilities are untrustworthy or not credible as witnesses

• Speech and/or cognition difficulties


The statistics point to a high number of people being victimized, but a low number are requesting victim services: clearly, many victims with disabilities are not receiving—or do not have access to—crime victim services


--- Page 5 ---

Highlight (color #FFEEC1), Oct 19, 2017 at 10:54 AM:
People with disabilities (sometimes referred to as self-advocates in the disability community) play an important role in educating criminal justice professionals that abuse can happen to anyone, at any time in their lives


but this is especially true for people with I/DD


personal safety plan


The name of a trusted person that will check in with you on a regular basis

Criminal justice professionals need to be able to talk openly about safety in ways that do not scare, overwhelm, or intimidate the person with a disability.

For example, an attorney can offer to slow down their communication and ask additional questions to confirm the victim understands what abuse means if the person seems confused. Criminal justice professionals need to know the types of violence that people with disabilities experience throughout their lives, such as physical and sexual violence, threats and intimidation, neglect, and financial exploitation. Knowing the signs and acknowledging when abuse is happening are the first steps to ending the epidemic

Research has shown that when people with I/DD live in segregated settings and attend


-

for Not Reporting Victimization

People with I/DD may not be able to tell someone when they are hurt by another person or persons. The reasons for not reporting include: • Not being educated about their rights • Fear of more abuse • Fear of not being believed • Fear of being blamed or punished • Fear of losing services • Fear of losing their home, job, family, or friends • Fear of telling on someone who has power over them • Being taught to go along with what others do to them


Assisting Victims with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)


Persons on the autism spectrum may: • Not understand their rights • Not understand what is expected of them • Not respond to verbal instruction • Run or move away when approached • Be unable to communicate with words • Only repeat what is said to them • Communicate with sign language, pictures or gestures, or use assistive technology to communicate • Avoid eye contact • Appear argumentative or stubborn • Say only “No!” or “Yes!” in response questions • Have difficulty judging personal space • Be overly sensitive to sensory input (e.g., flashing lights, sirens, crowds) • Have a decreased cognitive ability when experiencing heightened anxiety or frustration • Become anxious or agitated, producing fight or flight responses, or behaviors such as screaming, hand flapping, or self–injury • Appear to be under the influence of narcotics or intoxicants • Have an associated medical condition such as a seizure disorder • Be fixated on a particular object or topic and may ask repeated questions • Speak in a monotone voice with unusual pronunciations • Reverse pronouns (“Can I stop?” instead of “Can you stop?”) • Give misleading statements • Have problems speaking at the correct volume • May, if verbal, be honest to the point of bluntness or rudeness • Not be able communicate the extent of trauma due to a lack of understanding of healthy sexuality or appropriate boundaries in care provider or other relationships • Have the need for a Forensic Interviewer with knowledge of autism • Not understand the criminal justice system and the expectations to assist in prosecution

Source: OVC/ASA Crime Victims with Autism Assistance, Education, and Training Program


People with autism may exhibit any of the following behaviors in an encounter with those providing support—do not misinterpret actions as deliberate, disrespectful, or hostile.

Underline (red), Oct 19, 2017 at 3:05 PM:
Have a decreased cognitive ability when experiencing heightened anxiety or frustration

Underline (red), Oct 19, 2017 at 3:05 PM:
Give misleading statements

Underline (red), Oct 19, 2017 at 3:05 PM:
Have the need for a Forensic Interviewer with knowledge of autism • Not understand the cr


--- Page 9 ---

Highlight (color #25FFE9), Oct 19, 2017 at 10:54 AM:
Addressing the Complex Communication Needs (CCN) of Victims with Disabilities


--- Page 10 ---

Highlight (color #25FFE9), Oct 19, 2017 at 3:05 PM:
When assisting crime victims with disabilities, the goal or any interview is to gather credible information. The following tips will help to ensure that the information provided by an individual with CCN is accurately understood by the interviewer. Helpful tips include: • Consider the environment. Whenever possible conduct the interview in a quiet space. Be aware of and try to avoid sounds created by copy machines, telephone, outside traffic, air conditioning/heating systems, tree branches brushing against a window, and voices outside interview room. • Fewer distractions help both the individual with CCN and the interviewer to focus on each other's words. Sit facing the person. Try not to move around too much or create any distractions, such as: answering a cell phone; shuffling papers; standing up and down; and making facial expressions. • Begin the interview by introducing yourself, explaining your role and asking the individual with CCN what their name is, and ask what is the most comfortable way for the person to communicate with you. Find out how the person indicates “yes” and “no”, their ability to spell (e.g. to give you the first letter of a word you are having difficulty understanding). Learn what other strategies they typically use (e.g. a communication device) and make sure they have access to it during the interview. • If you don't understand or aren't sure what the person is saying, be sure to ask for clarification. Be comfortable with providing the individual with authentic feedback about what you have, or have not, understood. Ask “can you tell me another way”. • Be patient. Refrain from asking a question before the previous question is answered. Stay focused on the individual and pay attention to the individual's body language. Consider conducting several short interviews, rather than a longer one. Remember there are resources and advocates who can help you in assisting crime victims with CCN. Consider contacting The Arc's National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability™, your local chapter of The Arc, the Autism Society, United Cerebral Palsy Association, your state Office of Behavioral/Intellectual Disabilities, or other disability organizations who may be able to provide additional information and support.


--- Page 11 ---

Highlight (color #25FFE9), Oct 19, 2017 at 10:54 AM:
Trauma-Informed Care and Individuals with I/DD: How Symptoms of Trauma Manifest as Behavioral Issues

Text (red), Oct 19, 2017 at 10:54 AM:
Bullying


--- Page 12 ---

Highlight (color #25FFE9), Oct 19, 2017 at 3:05 PM:
refers to a state of agitation in which the individual is easily triggered into explosive behavior and is constantly ready for something horrible to occur, such as an attack, disaster, or betrayal.


--- Page 15 ---

Highlight (color #25FFE9), Oct 19, 2017 at 10:54 AM:
Call to Action for Criminal Justice Professionals


(report generated by GoodReader)



Sent from my iPad

The new Old Weston Rd



Collapsible Minnow Trap, lost sports in the Junction and Parkdale

Collapsible Minnow Trap




U. S. PATENT APRiI, 16th, 1907.

Tae most convenient and effective minnow catcher on the market. Constructed of transparent ciliuoid. is invisible in water and will stand rough usage.

Perfectly collapsible—can be put in suit case.

SHIPPED IN SERVICABLE METAL CASE—PRICE $3.50 NET. Descriptive Booklet sent on request.

A. J. ALGATE, 98 King St. West , Toronto, Canada,



[embed]http://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/14597128889[/embed]

$500 million pledge to address affordable housing in the Seattle area, by Microsoft, what Canadian company can do this here?

With its $500 million pledge to address affordable housing in the Seattle area, Microsoft isn’t primarily cutting checks to local charities. Private companies have done that before. Nor is it proposing to create housing for its own employees, as corporations have done in the past, too.

Rather, Microsoft is trying to help fix a market failure — a job government typically does.

“It really represents something almost unprecedented,” said Matthew Gordon Lasner, an associate professor of urban studies and planning at Hunter College. “What we’re seeing Microsoft do is in effect privately assume the role that historically the federal government and the states have played.”

Microsoft’s announcement is welcome news in the Seattle region, where housing costs have risen faster lately than in any other part of the country. But the fact that a tech company has to step in to help ensure the development of affordable housing points to a long-building reality nationwide: The federal government has largely retreated from this role.

The government spent about three times as much on housing programsin the 1970s as it does today, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition. In the years since, the government has gotten out of the business of building public housing. And capital funds to repair the remaining public housing stock have been cut in half over the last 15 years. 

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Over this time, federal resources have increasingly shifted away from subsidizing the construction of affordable housing to subsidizing renters who find housing in the private market. And now most new below-market-rate housing is built not by public agencies, but by nonprofit developers leveraging tax credits. The value of those credits has declined recently as well, as a result of changes in the tax billpassed in 2017.

In a sense, Microsoft’s proposal is an extension of this story, as private actors continue to step in where the government once stood.

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“Our part to play is to bring capital to solve this problem,” Microsoft’s president, Brad Smith, said at an event introducing the plan on Thursday. 

Today in the Seattle region, the problem isn’t simply that government support has dwindled. Construction and land costs to build new housing have risen, and the wages that low-skilled workers can afford to spend on rent have stagnated.

“There is no public entity that can fill a hole as big as this,” Mr. Smith said. If the only focus is putting money into public housing, he said, “it will go too slowly and you will end up with housing that may not stand the test of time.”

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Microsoft says it plans to spend $25 million on grants to local nonprofits working on homelessness. But the bulk of the money will be invested, some in affordable housing developments that use tax credits, and others in middle-class developments that wouldn't be financially feasible without lower-interest loans. 

As those loans are repaid, Microsoft will lend the capital to other developments as well, in theory leveraging the money to create what Microsoft estimates could be tens of thousands of units of housing, or far more than would be possible if the company simply spent the money directly building apartments itself.

Ed Goetz, a professor at the University of Minnesota who has studied the history of public housing in America, said: “I don’t want to diminish the magnitude of what they’re doing. I think it’s important, and it will help. But it won’t solve Seattle’s problem.” 

Microsoft has called for other companies to become involved. But Mr. Goetz said he couldn’t imagine a situation where there were enough Microsofts out there to truly address the country’s housing crisis.

“The federal government is the entity that has the resources to do this,” Mr. Goetz said.

Diane Yentel, the president of the National Low Income Housing Coalition, said she would welcome a trend in which more major tech companies put up money to address housing. But she warned of the risk of further letting the government off the hook. 

“Today’s modern phenomenon of homelessness didn’t exist in the late 1970s because our country housed almost everyone, including the lowest-income and most vulnerable families,” Ms. Yentel said in an email. “The key difference between then and now is declining federal subsidies.”

As Microsoft unveiled its plans, the Department of Housing and Urban Development remained largely shuttered in Washington during the government shutdown. Federal contracts with hundreds of property owners who provide housing to subsidized tenants have expired during the shutdown, leaving thousands of families at risk of losing their homes. 

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Activists in communities like Seattle have made a strong case that tech companies bear some responsibility for making the housing crisis worse. Those companies have brought thousands of highly paid workers into housing markets that don’t have room for everyone. But among the many culprits behind the crisis, the government’s retrenchment is critical, too.

“This is a problem that is rooted in our political culture,” Mr. Lasner said. “It’s a problem that’s rooted in the myths we tell ourselves about who we are as Americans. We’ve always been skittish and uncomfortable with the idea of housing subsidies, or even interventions like rent control.” 

Americans are more comfortable with private-sector solutions, he said. But for an area as complicated as housing, he added, “they’re not enough to cope with the challenge.”

Karen Weise contributed reporting.

Emily Badger writes about cities and urban policy for The Upshot from the Washington bureau. She's particularly interested in housing, transportation and inequality — and how they're all connected. She joined The Times in 2016 from The Washington Post. @emilymbadger

14 mistakes foreigners make when they move to Toronto.

work-shy and slow at finishing education? yea you

claimed Danes are work-shy and slow at finishing their education,

PAINTED IDENTITIES showing of paintings, discussing what happens when young, first and second generation artists of colour reclaim this traditional medium and turn this visual language back on the contemporary art world?


“PAINTED IDENTITIES”

Exhibition Curator: JJ Lee

Exhibiting Artists: Iman Bhatti, Jasmine Cardenas, Angelica Fernandes, Yi-Shuan Lee, Wei Qi, Faryal Shezhad, Zhizi Wang and Michael Veneracion


 

Exhibition dates: Wednesday Jan 2 to Friday Jan 25, 2019

Opening Reception: Thurs., Jan. 10, 6 to 8 p.m.

Panel DiscussionSaturday January 19th, 1 to 3 pm

Artists in the exhibition will have a conversation about contemporary painting and how their position between two cultures has —or hasn’t—impacted their work. 

Moderated by the Curator, JJ Lee

Participating Panelists: Jasmine Cardenas, Angelica Fernandes, Yi-Shuan Lee, Faryal Shezhad, Michael Veneracion

“Painting and identity politics do not mix easily.” [1] Kenneth Baker


 

Painting, especially of the “oil-on-canvas” variety, is laden with historical baggage and hierarchical genres, and has been upheld as the canon of fine art in the white Western world.  So what happens when young, first and second generation artists of colour reclaim this traditional medium and turn this visual language back on the contemporary art world? How do you navigate a medium that historically has contributed to your own “otherness”?  In light of current dialogues about cultural appropriation, questions of authenticity and authorship are ever more important. 


 

This exhibition features eight young painters of colour. Their identities are hyphenated Canadian: Chinese, Pakistani, Indian, Ecuadorian, Taiwanese, Filipino. They are equally positioned between a western education in a medium traditionally mired in Eurocentric history and their own cultural/ethnic identities. When they were students, they asked where they were represented in their art history and studio classes. Now, as artists, they are making paintings that reflect the diverse communities we live in through a range of approaches: employing traditional techniques and processes from their own cultural histories, and merging them with Western painting practices, and inserting their visible minority selves into the imagery. They are telling the stories of the new faces of painting. 


More detail about the exhibiting artists:

Iman Bhatti, born in Lahore, lives in Toronto and identifies as Pakistani-Canadian.

Jasmine Cardenas, born in Mississauga, lives in Toronto and identifies as Ecuadorian-Canadian.

Angelica Fernandes, born Mumbai, lives in Toronto and identifies as Indo-Canadian.

Yi-Shuan Lee, born in Taichung, lives in Toronto and Taiwan, identifies as Taiwanese-Canadian.

Wei Qi, born in Tianjin, lives in Toronto and identifies as Chinese-Canadian.

Faryal Shezhad, born in Sargodha, lives in King City and identifies as Pakistani-Canadian.

Zhizi Wang, was born in Xi'an lives in London ON and identifies as Chinese-Canadian.

Michael Veneracion, was born in Dubai, lives in Toronto, identifies as Filipino-Canadian.

Curator: JJ Lee, born in Halifax, lives on Toronto and identifies as Chinese-Canadian. JJ Lee is a practicing artist and an Assistant Professor of Contemporary Issues of Representation at OCAD University. She taught the artists in this exhibition when they were students at OCAD in 2017.



Monday, April 29, 2019

George chuvalo Community Center stuff for the opening

Check out the itinerary for May 11th! Hope to see you all there! RSVP to our event page:



https://www.facebook.com/events/303973283607891/



St Johns Rd “Y” removal during and after.



Yonge and Queen streets what is left of the Philip Jamieson Clothing Company.

The building on the northwest corner of the intersection Yonge and Queen streets, still has a little of its original wooden construction. After redevelopment only the brick front will remain as part of the new building.


 


 


 

 

OCAD Graduate Exhibition May 1th to 5th

OCAD Graduate Exhibition, Wed, May, 1 to Sunday, May 5 Toronto’s largest FREE art/design exhibition, Wednesday, May 1 6:30 p.m. – 11 p.m. Thur, May 2 9:30am - 8pm. Fri, May 3, 9:30 a.m.– 8 p.m.Sat, May 4, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sun, May 5, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m

Venue and Address

OCAD University:
100 McCaul St.
115 McCaul st.
113 McCaul St.

TTC Directions: Get off at St. Patrick Subway Station and walk west on Dundas to McCaul (south of Dundas).

Accessible parking permit holders may park in designated city parking spots for free

Please note that parking along the west side of McCaul Street between Dundas Street and Grange Road will be closed on Thursday, May 2 and Friday, May 3 between 9 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.


SIGN UP TO THE FACEBOOK EVENT to get sneak peeks of the work you’ll see at GradEx

More than 800 promising young artists and designers are exhibiting at OCAD University's 104th GradEx! This year, GradEx is a five-day exhibition spread across several buildings on campus including the iconic Sharp Centre for Design. The university will throw open its doors, inviting the community to see works by the creative minds of OCAD U’s Class of 2019.

Students from undergraduate and graduate programs will show their final thesis work to an audience of more than 45,000 guests, some of whom attend the show to recruit new talent for their own galleries and firms.

Sunday, April 28, 2019

Safe Rail update



Above disused Junction railyard light tower.

Safe Rail update, all text the group.

Hope you're all enjoying the warmer weather and sunshine!

I just wanted to share with you an update from Safe Rail Communities (non-profit co-founded by myself and Junction neighbours).

Safe Rail Communities continues our efforts, advocating on behalf of residents who live, work and play in rail communities across Canada. If you haven't been following lately, we have just completed a 2 year project, which focused on creating rail safety resources for residents who live along rail lines.

Please visit the link below to access these resources:
http://www.saferail.ca/rail-safety-toolkit

As we wrap up this project, we need to bring our attention to fundraising so we can continue our advocacy work and support a Canada wide Facebook and social media campaign in the lead up to the upcoming federal election. We are planning a garage sale and fundraiser, along with a hoop-a-thon on Saturday, June 1st.

Please let me know if you have anything to donate (DM or email at infosaferail@gmail.com) for the garage sale or visit the link below to donate to our hoop-a-thon team:
https://www.payit2.com/f/hoop-a-thon4saferail

Also, if you would like to join our hoop-a-thon team and collect pledges, you can simply share the above link or collect pledges using our pledge form (link below):

https://na1.documents.adobe.com/public/fs?aid=CBFCIBAA3AAABLblqZhBTS7iZECMDeJULv7D0hjQOg8yu_g9X3gdzYOZjqzVktraA9A4Oj0lE65QDPu_emVs*

The hoop-a-thon will take place at Vine Ave playground on June 1st from 1:30pm-3:30pm and will include hooping lessons and the half hour challenge.

Have a great day!

Regent Park Phase 3 today's photos of demo of 1957 buildings.



Dewatering on Toronto’s east quay, next to sugar beach.

https://youtu.be/km4y8Y_SDl4

Museum of illusions is such a wonderful place for kids, and is so full all the time.

Front St, across the Young Peoples Theater.

Friday, April 26, 2019

Reményi House Of Music will be leaving Bloor St West, for a little while.

 

 


 

Reményi history from the stores site,210 Bloor Street West,


 


July of 1890, Mihály Reményi, a newly appointed “master violin maker,” opened a tiny violin shop in his native city of Budapest, Hungary.

Although orphaned at an early age, Reményi was heir to a distinguished musical legacy through a predecessor, Edouard Reményi, who was known as an illustrious musical figure of the 19th century. Violinist, world traveler and intellectual, Edouard Remenyi also held posts as court violinist to Queen Victoria and Louis Napoleon. He was a lifelong friend of Franz Liszt, and is the man credited with bringing the talents of Johannes Brahms to light, after discovering the impoverished, barely 18-year-old genius playing in a sailor's saloon on the Hamburg waterfront.


The firm was re-established by Zoltán Reményi upon immigrating to Canada in 1959 with his wife and son. Growing from a tiny 13-foot wide store on Toronto's Queen Street, they moved to their present location on Bloor Street in 1979, adjacent to the campus of the University of Toronto and The Royal Conservatory of Music.


 


 


 

Today, the Remenyi building presents three floors of quality pianos, string instruments, accessories, repair shops, and the Music Bookstore, which specializes in sheet music and educational materials.


 


 


 


 

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Sunday, May 5,48th Annual Cabbagetown Forsythia Festival.


All text the group





Cabbagetown Residents Association Image




Sunday, May 5, we will welcome the season with open arms as neighbours gather to celebrate at the 48th Annual Cabbagetown Forsythia Festival.





This annual Cabbagetown tradition has not only grown in enthusiasm over the years, it has grown in size!





Do come to the festival hungry as well as thirsty. Mark from Steak and Chops will be there barbecuing his signature burgers – with more grills added to cut down on the wait time for food – and Erin from Stout Irish Pub will be on hand to pour you some of her quality craft beer. (And yes, wine will be back!)





The festival will be full of activities for kids of all ages: Face painting, craft station, bean bag toss, parachute game, Cycle Solutions bike check station, photo booth, dangling doughnuts, and more.





We’ll add more details about fun new activities as they are confirmed.





Do bring your refillable water bottles as The City of Toronto’s H2OtoGo will be on site to supply drinking water and don’t forget that we now accept credit cards for purchase of food, drink and prize tickets!





Be sure not to miss the one of the most exciting parts of this neighbourhood tradition and join us for the parade through our streets. We gather at the corner of Sumach and Winchester streets starting at 10 a.m. Yellow pompoms will be handed out and we encourage everyone (pets included) to “dress in their best”… in the colour yellow! Parade will depart at 10:30 a.m. led by the amazing Heavyweights Brass Band, loop around the block, ending at Wellesley Park, where the festival fun begins.





Come one, come all… the festival is free for everyone to attend and it really wouldn’t be the same without you there.





for·syth·i·a/fərˈsiTHēə,fôrˈsiTHēə/noun





  1. a widely cultivated ornamental Eurasian shrub whose bright yellow flowers appear in early spring before the leaves.









Jarvis St family courthouse, 1958 completion photo, and current commemorative cast sign.



Tuesday, April 23, 2019

2019 High Park play area changes



Colourized city map showing High Park area and site location of major play and landscape changes.

Changes to take place.

...

Cast-in-place concrete playground and sandbox border  Concrete playground ramp  Rubber playground ramp  Rubber safety surfacing  Engineered wood fibre safety surfacing and wear mats  Sub-surface drainage system c/w drywell, overflow and stone spillway/ splash pad  Sandbox  Playground equipment  Site furnishings (includes benches, patio tables, and umbrellas)  Concrete seat walls (integral beige concrete)  Decorative Boulders  Upright log border  Horizontal log border  Wading pool concrete tank and apron repairs  Replace center turret with new concrete fill wall  New wading pool drains and associated site servicing  Wading pool chamber upgrades (includes mechanical works, and new lids)  ‘Unstructured Playground Area' materials (includes placement of decorative and memorial boulders supplied and delivered by others; stumps, branches, birch logs; plastic tubing, elbows and eaves troughs; wooden planks, blocks, boxes and saw horses)  Sod restoration

Monday, April 22, 2019

Mulder variety store at Mc Murray Ave to become restaurant, what?



Images of the F.G. Gardiner Expressway, concrete casting site being set up.













Tug at Suger beach today.





large Voith-Schneider tractor tug was built in 1973 by Star Shipyards as Vachon for Quebec Cartier Mines. Used her entire career for ship assist in Port Cartier, QC, the tug’s ownership was transferred to ArcelorMittal Mines Canada when they purchased the steelmaker Dofasco in 2007. The Vachon was retired from Port Cartier in 2017 and sold to Le Groupe Ocean of Quebec, QC, who renamed the tug Ocean A. Gauthier.The Ocean A. Gauthier is based in Hamilton, Ontario. It provides ship assist services in that port and other ports on Lake Ontario such as Toronto, Oshawa, and the Welland Canal.Type: Twin Screw Tractor Tug
Year Built: 1973
Builder: Star Shipyards Ltd., New Westminster, BC
Hull No.: 408
Horsepower: 3,600 bhp
Length: 98′ 11″

Sunday, April 21, 2019

Saturday, April 20, 2019

F.G. Gardiner Expressway Rehabilitation Project: Section 1 - Jarvis Street to Cherry Street



Contract Award for the F.G. Gardiner Expressway Rehabilitation Project: Section 1 - Jarvis Street to Cherry Street, Request for Tenders 1-2018, Contract No. 18ECS-TI-01GE and Amendments to Purchase Orders for Owner Controlled Insurance and External Legal Services

Committee Decision

The Public Works and Infrastructure Committee:

1. In accordance with Section 195-8.4A of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 195 (Purchasing By-Law), granted authority to award Contract 18ECS-TI-01GE, Tender Call 1-2018, for the construction of the F.G. Gardiner Expressway Rehabilitation Project: Section 1 – Jarvis Street to Cherry Street to Aecon Construction and Materials Limited in the amount of $308,531,227 net of all applicable taxes and charges ($313,961,377 net of HST recoveries) having submitted the lowest compliant bid and meeting the specifications in conformance with the Tender requirements. The award amount includes a contingency allowance of $60,000,000.

2. In accordance with Section 71-11.1.C of the City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 71 (Financial Control By-Law), granted authority to amend Purchase Order No. 6041404 with Marsh Canada Limited by an additional amount of $1,680,057 net of all applicable taxes and charges ($1,814,462 including PST), and authorize the procurement of an Owner Controlled Insurance Program specific to Contract No. 18ECS-TI-01GE for the rehabilitation of the F.G. Gardiner Expressway between Jarvis Street and Cherry Street.

3. In accordance with Section 71-11.1.C of the City of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 71 (Financial Control By-Law), granted authority to amend Purchase Order No. 6045739 with Blake, Cassels and Graydon LLP, by an amount of $1,000,000, net of all applicable taxes and charges ($1,017,600 net of HST recoveries), revising the current value from $500,000 to $1,500,000, net of all applicable taxes, to allow for the continued provision of legal services as required to provide ongoing advice and litigation support on the execution and administration, including claims, of Contract 18ECS-TI-01GE and the tender process, including preparation of tender documents and agreements, and execution and administration, including claims, of the required agreements in respect of the planned F.G Gardiner Expressway Rehabilitation Project: Sections 2 and 3.

Origin

(June 4, 2018) Report from the Chief Engineer and Executive Director, Engineering and Construction Services, the Chief Purchasing Officer and the Acting Executive Director, Corporate Finance

Summary

The purpose of this report is to: (a) advise of the results of Tender Call 1-2018 issued for Contract No. 18ECS-TI-01GE for the rehabilitation of the F.G. Gardiner Expressway (Expressway) between Jarvis Street and Cherry Street, and to request the authority to award this contract to Aecon Construction and Materials Limited in the amount of $280,840,287 which represents the "A" bid price including HST. An additional $60,000,000 plus HST will be available to the Chief Engineer and Executive Director, Engineering and Construction Services for the Project as may be required; (b) request authority to amend Purchase Order No. 6041404 with Marsh Canada Limited, for the procurement, maintenance and payment of insurance premiums associated with an Owner Controlled Insurance Program (OCIP) for Contract No. 18ECS-TI-01GE, for rehabilitation of the F. G. Gardiner Expressway Section 1 – Jarvis Street to Cherry Street, by an additional amount of $1,680,057 net of all taxes ($1,814,462 including PST); and, (c) request authority to amend Purchase Order No. 6045739 with Blake, Cassels and Graydon LLP, by $1,000,000 in order to provide ongoing external expert legal services required to successfully execute and administer Contract 18ECS-TI-01GE, and in respect of the F.G Gardiner Expressway Rehabilitation Project: Sections 2 and 3.

Contract No. 18ECS-TI-01GE is the first contract for the rehabilitation of the Expressway using the implementation approach approved by City Council in December 2016. There is an urgent need to award this contract because the "elevated" section of the Expressway between Jarvis Street to Cherry Street is at the end of its service life and is an immediate first priority for rehabilitation.

The scope of work for Contract No. 18ECS-TI-01GE involves replacing the 1.1 kilometres of concrete deck and girders of the Expressway between Jarvis Street and Cherry Street, replacing the westbound off-ramp at Sherbourne Street and the eastbound on-ramp at Jarvis Street, rehabilitating the westbound off-ramp leading to Yonge, Bay and York Streets, and installing new street lighting along the Expressway and ramps. Construction is planned to commence in the Fall of 2018 and be completed by the end of 2020.

Amending Purchase Order No. 6041404 with Marsh Canada Limited, the City's Insurance Broker, allows the City to institute an Owner Controlled Insurance Program for Contract No. 18ECS-TI-01GE. This provides the City with direct control over the terms and conditions of insurance coverage, including developing and imposing the most appropriate and comprehensive clauses needed to effectively and prudently manage and minimize the risks associated with the project.

Amending Purchase Order No. 6045739 with Blake, Cassels and Graydon LLP allows the City to continue to rely on expert external legal advice and litigation support with the execution and administration, including claims, of Contract 18ECS-TI-01GE and the tender process, including preparation of tender documents and agreements, and execution and administration, including claims, of the required agreements in respect of the upcoming F.G Gardiner Expressway Rehabilitation Project: Sections 2 and 3.

Background Information

(June 4, 2018) Report and Attachment 1 from the Chief Engineer and Executive Director, Engineering and Construction Services, the Chief Purchasing Officer and the Acting Executive Director, Corporate Finance on Contract Award for the F.G. Gardiner Expressway Rehabilitation Project: Section 1 - Jarvis Street to Cherry Street, Request for Tenders 1-2018, Contract No. 18ECS-TI-01GE and Amendments to Purchase Orders for Owner Controlled Insurance and External Legal Services

(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2018/pw/bgrd/backgroundfile-115753.pdf)

Speakers

Friday, April 19, 2019

Transportation Safety Board recommends changes to railcar brake procedures in wake of fatal B.C. crash

ERIC ATKINS Globe newspaper


TRANSPORTATION REPORTER
Canada’s rail-safety investigator has urged the government to review the way brakes on grain-hopper cars are inspected and maintained in the wake of a fatal runaway train crash near Field, B.C. The Transportation Safety Board also called for greater use of handbrakes on trains that have made emergency stops.


The TSB issued the advisories as part of its investigation into the crash of Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd. Train 301, a 112-car grain train that rolled away after having made an emergency halt on a steep grade, sped out of control down a slope in the Rocky Mountains, jumped the tracks and killed its three-man crew on Feb. 4

Science Odyssey, the national celebration of Canadian Science & Technology from May 6 - 19th.

RCIScience is participating in Science Odyssey, the national celebration of Canadian Science & Technology from May 6 - 19th. Look out for us during Science Rendezvous at Ryerson University on May 11

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

LOVE THIS TOWN: WATERFRONT LESSONS FROM HALIFAX.


https://www.pps.org/article/love-this-town-waterfront-lessons-from-halifax-nova-scotia-canada


TREXO ROBOTICS, MOBILITY FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES, much needed devices within Toronto’s cracked streets and roads for the disabled.




Trexo Robotics, a company which aims to redefine mobility solutions for people of all ages and abilities, is building one of the first wearable robotic devices designed to allow children with disabilities to walk. Trexo’s solutions consists of a pair of robotic legs, also called an exoskeleton, that can connect to a child’s legs, allowing them to stand and walk.

  • Guided gait pattern, Weight bearing,  Active assist

Monday, April 15, 2019

Heart of the City is hosted by Park People,

Parks define quality of life in our cities. 

Attend the only National Conference focused exclusively on city parks across Canada.

Be among the cross-section of 200 people in attendance including park professionals and community leaders whose work focuses on leveraging the power of city parks. 

Heart of the City is hosted by Park People, the organization that supports and mobilizes people to help them activate the power of parks to improve quality of life in cities across Canada.

Join us in Montreal June 12-14 2019.

Register
Keynote Speakers


Rena Soutar

Rena Soutar is the first

Climbing wall for preteens at Toronto community centre.

Sunday, April 14, 2019

free tree from the City of Toronto

free tree from the City of Toronto is now open! This is your chance to get a free native tree with mulch for your yard and to help the City achieve its goal of 40% tree canopy coverage.... Beauty and cooling all in one green package!
Green 13 is working in partnership with West Toronto Baptist Church, the City, and Toronto Parks and Trees Foundation to provide free trees to Toronto residents.
We invite you to register online at www.treeforme.caor call 416 465 7555 for more information. All you need to do is pre register for your tree and bring a bag for some mulch. There will also be demonstrations on the half hour of how to plant your tree for a successful growth.
Our local date is May 11 from 10 am to 2pm. Our location is the West Toronto Baptist Church at 3049 Dundas Street West, near Quebec Avenue in the Junction.
Let's continue to green our city! Register and claim your tree on May 11!

Thursday, April 11, 2019

After 12 years shuttered, Paradise THEATRE re-opens in 2019!, signs going up today.


 


 


 


 

 

All content below from the projects site.

ABOUT PARADISE

A 1937 heritage-designated Art Deco venue in Toronto's Bloorcourt neighbourhood, Paradise reopens in 2019 following a highly anticipated renovation. The building on this site has operated as a cinema since 1910, and we are proud to continue its century-long tradition of bringing Torontonians together.

Paradise offers a unique, welcoming experience through food, drink and the arts. The complex includes:

PARADISE THEATRE

A state-of-the-art venue presenting a curated mix of newly released films, older classics and undiscovered gems, as well as live music, talk series and multi-arts events.

OSTERIA RIALTO

A full-service restaurant offering up fresh, seasonal ingredients in dishes that innovate on classic Italian cuisine.

BAR BILTMORE

Spritzes, sours and negronis are enjoyed alongside small bites and dishes from the raw bar.

HISTORY OF PARADISE

In 1910, the “one-storey brick theatorium” Bloor Palace is built on the corner of Bloor and Westmoreland. 

The venue is renamed The Kitchener in 1918, purportedly in recognition of the WWI British war secretary whose mysterious demise at sea spawned endless conspiracy theories. 

Paradise Theatre is born in 1937, built in the Art Deco and Art Moderne styles under the direction of one of Toronto’s earliest practising Jewish architects, Benjamin Brown. The new venue had 643 seats, including a balcony where you could “smoke if you wish.”

In the following decades, Paradise changed hands between the Odeon Theatres chain, and local German (Paradise Kino) and Italian (Nuovo Cinema Paradise) owners.

Paradise in Toronto historic photo

In 1966, a local family, the Giacominis, purchased the venue and operated it as a beloved neighbourhood Italian filmhouse in 1981. Every three months, Francesco Giacomini brought un-subtitled 35mm film prints back from Italy to share with a local audience.

Paradise is re-named “Eve’s Paradise” in 1986, part of the “Eves and Edens” chain of adult theatres.

The Festival Cinemas chain takes on Paradise in 1990, showing repertory and arthouse fare until 2006.

In 2012, the still-empty Paradise is purchased by Moray Tawse.

After 12 years shuttered, Paradise re-opens in 2019! 

Alfred S. Rogers and the start of a cement company

The sales agent of Grey & Bruce was Alfred S. Rogers, a Toronto entrepreneur, who owned a number of companies, among them a fuel supply...