Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Feb. 8: Help Green the Future of Lawn & Garden Care

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Join the city as they  investigate challenging issues of reducing  emissions from Small Engine Equipment

Background info


Small Engines are Big Polluters

Most people do not associate air pollution with mowing the lawn. Yet emissions

from lawn mowers, snow blowers, chain saws, leaf vacuums, and similar outdoor

power equipment are a significant source of pollution. Today’s small engines emit

high levels of carbon monoxide, a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. They also

emit hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides, pollutants that contribute to the formation

of ozone. While ozone occurs naturally in the upper atmosphere and shields

the earth from harmful radiation, ozone at ground level is a noxious pollutant.

Ground-level ozone impairs

Small Engines are Big Polluters

Most people do not associate air pollution with mowing the lawn. Yet emissions from lawn mowers, snow blowers, chain saws, leaf vacuums, and similar outdoor power equipment are a significant source of pollution. Today’s small engines emit high levels of carbon monoxide, a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. They also emit hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides, pollutants that contribute to the formation of ozone. While ozone occurs naturally in the upper atmosphere and shields the earth from harmful radiation, ozone at ground level is a noxious pollutant. Ground-level ozone impairs from the city site on the subject

In may May 2009, City Council adopted the “Greening Small Engine Equipment Strategy”. This multi-faceted approach enables the City to accelerate the replacement of its older, inefficient lawn and garden equipment, and to explore alternative landscaping practices. The strategy also led to the creation of “Cut it Out Toronto”, a public education and equipment disposal program for older equipment held at Toronto’s Community Environment Days.lawnmower_new


The next step is to explore additional options and measures to advance the phase out of older, inefficient small-engine equipment across Toronto, including potential regulatory options. Residents and members of the landscaping community are invited to share their thoughts on what we can do to build a plan that is fair and equitable to all.

Small two-stroke engines found in older lawn and garden equipment, such as leaf and snow blowers, lawnmowers and trimmers, emit a high level of pollutants into the air.

Join us to address this challenge as we investigate

actions to reduce these emissions, including potential regulatory measures.

Date: Monday, February 8, 2010

Time: 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Location: Meeting Room 1, Etobicoke Civic Centre,

399 The West Mall ( http://www.toronto.ca/involved/projects/2strokes/index.htm )

To register, call 416-338-2848 or 416-397-0831 (TTY)

Take TTC:
Bloor/Danforth subway to Islington.
Take Burnhamthorpe bus #50 west to The West Mall
Automobile and bicycle parking available.

[email_link]

Did you know that running an older, gas-powered lawnmower for one hour creates the same amount of pollution as driving a new car from Toronto to Ottawa?

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